Latino vote | Texas Public Radio

Latino vote

H. Michael Karshis CC By 2.0 : http://bit.ly/2Y4mHJH

Latinos will make up the largest minority voting group in 2020. What can the history and rise of the Latino vote tell us about the changing U.S. political landscape?

  

SVREP

Lydia Camarillo, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, plays a key role in developing SVREP’s nonpartisan voter mobilization efforts.  

LIFE Magazine

A lawsuit against the Texas Secretary of State David Whitley was recently settled after his office released a list of 95,000 voters accused of being non-citizens. Latino voters who were on the list and several civil rights organizations filed the suit, including the Southwest Voter Registration Project.

Austin Institute for the Study of Family and Culture

When it comes to Latinos, the U.S. has a habit of placing them into one uniform group. But the reality is Latinos have a wide variety of identities, which can have an impact far beyond a single ethnic category.

Gabriel Acevedo, professor at St. Mary’s University, and Kevin Stuart, executive director of the Austin Institute, discuss the findings in their study “Latinos in America.”

From Texas Standard:

When it comes to the Latino block of the electorate, you’ve probably heard politicians and analysts describe it this way.

From Texas Standard:

We're just 12 days away from Election Day, and four days into early voting across the Lone Star State. Many polling places are reporting record early-voting turnout. Sharon Navarro, a professor of political science at University of Texas at San Antonio, says that shows voters are energized this year.

From Texas Standard.

On Monday, the Washington Post broke the story of the now-defunct voter fraud commission purchasing Texas voter records. The story began:

“President Donald Trump’s voting commission asked every state and the District of Columbia for detailed voter registration data, but in Texas’ case it took an additional step: It asked to see Texas records that identify all voters with Hispanic surnames, newly released documents show.”

Officials from both the White House and the state of Texas say the data was never delivered, because of a lawsuit brought by Texas voting rights advocates after the request was made.

Shelley D. Kofler / Texas Public Radio

This year Hispanics made up a larger percentage of early voters in Bexar County – and the state- than they did four years ago.  Democrats believe that will help their candidates.  Republicans aren’t so sure.  Both parties were analyzing the impact of the Latino surge as they made a last push for turnout this weekend.

A record 15.1 million Texans are registered to vote in the November election. And a large number of them are Latinos, who have recently become citizens. But will they come out and cast ballots?

Andrew Schneider from Here & Now contributor Houston Public Media reports.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio got booed off a stage in Orlando on Sunday by a crowd that was overwhelmingly Latino.

It happened at Calle Orange, a street festival in downtown Orlando geared toward the city's large Puerto Rican community. The icy reception was an indication of the challenges that Rubio, a Republican of Cuban heritage, has faced in locking down support from Latinos in Florida as the state's Latino electorate has begun to shift to the left.

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