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climate change

Steve Johnson CC0: http://bit.ly/2kiFWxf

More hot and dry days, aging infrastructure and population growth are all factors in the state of water in and around San Antonio. How are area water agencies working to ensure sustainable, accessible water resources for the future?


Jon Callas CC BY 2.0: http://bit.ly/354Dk7D

City officials will release the newest iteration of the San Antonio Climate Action and Adaptation Plan on August 22. What's changed? Will the debate over if and how the City should address climate change continue to be mired in controversy or is there common ground to be found for addressing climate change on the local level?


NASA

The world’s rising heat is creating a serious problem for the United States Military. Despite the fact that the commander in chief, President Donald Trump, calls climate change a hoax – the Pentagon sees it differently. The U.S. top military brass calls climate change as serious threat to national security.

July 2019 isn't over yet and it's on track to deliver the hottest temperatures ever recorded since the dawn of weather tracking.  It's beating the previous record month which was June 2019. 


From Texas Standard:

A new study shows Texas homeowners along the Gulf Coast have lost tens of millions of dollars of property value over a 12-year period ending in 2017 due to rising sea levels. The hardest hit city has been Galveston, followed by three other cities within 40 miles: Jamaica Beach, Bolivar Peninsula and Surfside Beach.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies, in for Terry Gross, who's off this week. If you want to hear some alarming facts about climate change, Bill McKibben has them. He writes in his new book that as the Earth warms, we're now seeing lethal heatwaves in some parts of the world and that the largest physical structures on our planet - the ice caps, coral reefs and rainforests - are disappearing before our eyes.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Public input on SA Climate Ready, the city of San Antonio’s proposed climate action plan, is underway.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A new study shows what the climate will be like for major Texas cities in 2080. Bottom line: It will be warmer and drier for most Texans.

The skin lesions are the first sign that something is wrong. Then limbs fall off and the body disintegrates, collapsing in on itself as it liquefies. In the end, what was once a sea star is only a puddle on the ocean floor.

Since 2013, sea star wasting disease has killed so many starfish along the Pacific Coast that scientists say it's the largest disease epidemic ever observed in wild marine animals. Where there used to be dozens of stars, scuba divers now report seeing none.

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