86th Legislature | Texas Public Radio

86th Legislature

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

With less than two weeks left in the 86th legislative session, lawmakers are racing to have their bills considered, passed and sent to Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk. The fate of much of the proposed legislation will be decided in these final days.

Nathan Cone / TPR

This edition of the Texas Water Symposium features lawmakers and analysts looking at current and proposed legislation that will affect water resources and property rights in Texas. Topics addressed include the Kinder Morgan pipeline project, flooding, water well protection, the Texas State Park system, and more.

Recorded March 28, 2019 at the Texas State Capitol building.

Moderator:

Vanessa Puig-Williams, Puig-Williams Law, PLLC

Panelists:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/14353667207

Sixty-four percent of Texans support laws protecting gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination, according to the Public Religion Research Institute.

Yet a new report from Equality Texas details the many obstacles that still remain for nearly 1 million LGBTQ+ individuals living in Texas. What can policy do to change the future of equality in the state? 


Courtesy Joyful Heart Foundation

A victim's forensic exam can be one of the strongest pieces of evidence in a sexual assault investigation. Why is so much evidence related to cases of sexual assault not being processed? 


Wikipedia Commons

From drafting new safety plans to increasing mental health resources on campuses, Texas lawmakers have varied proposals for addressing school safety this legislative session.

The 86th Texas legislature is in full swing. A coalition of San Antonio businesses and chambers of commerce are teaming up to vocalize their legislative priorities. 


David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

As the 86th Texas Legislature begins, many are wondering if this is the session when overdue repairs are made to the state's damaged public information act.  This includes a law dubbed the "Dead Suspect Loophole." 

We talk to the family of an 18-year-old who died while in custody of the Mesquite Police Department. They were told they could not gain access to details relating to Graham's death because of this controversial law.