The American Homefront Project | Texas Public Radio

The American Homefront Project

The American Homefront Project features reporting on military life and veterans issues.

We're visiting bases to chronicle how troops are working and living. We're meeting military families. We're talking with veterans to learn about the challenges they face. We cover major policy issues at the Pentagon and Department of Veterans Affairs, and we report on family issues service members and veterans experience in their daily lives. From the youngest military recruits to the veterans of World War II, we're reporting in-depth stories about Americans who serve.

Funding for The American Homefront Project comes from:

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David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Updated 6 p.m.

The government has filed a motion to dismiss a lawsuit from a family who lost nine of its members in the Sutherland Springs shooting.

In the motion filed Friday, the government claims it cannot be held liable for acts committed by a third party, claiming it retains sovereign immunity due to the jurisdiction where the shooting took place.

"Texas generally imposes no actionable duty on a private person to protect another from a third party’s criminal acts," the motion states.

"Ring of Red: A Barrio Story" relies on oral histories to tell the rarely heard stories of Mexican-American veterans.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

For veterans who need things like wheelchairs, walkers, and artificial limbs, getting them from the Department of Veterans Affairs can be a difficult, lengthy process. According to the agency’s own numbers, thousands have waited longer than 30 days for their requests to be fulfilled.


Last year, the VA began offering mental health treatment to vets who don't normally qualify for V-A care. Since then, fewer than 200 people have used the program.

Inflexible work schedules and lack of support can make it tough for new mothers in the military to keep breastfeeding their children.

Though medical marijuana is legal in most states, the Department of Veterans Affairs will neither recommend nor prescribe it because of a longstanding federal law.

The VA has opened more call centers and hired hundreds of additional responders after complaints that some callers experienced long hold times or were sent to voicemail.

The number of veterans in the VA healthcare system who are 70 or older is expected to grow 30 percent in the next eight years.

Families hope advances in DNA technology and thawing U.S./North Korean relations will help the government recover and identify long-missing remains of service members.

Veterans now make up less than 20 percent of Congress, compared with about 75 percent in the 1960s. Some high-profile candidates are trying to reverse that trend.

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