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00000174-b11b-ddc3-a1fc-bfdbb1d30001HearSA is an online audio archive of public programming intended to foster discussion and enhance awareness of informative local presentations and events. The archive includes lectures, panel discussions, book readings, and more. HearSA is presented by Texas Public Radio in association with its local partners. It is important to recognize that the opinions presented in these programs are those of the author or presenter, not Texas Public Radio or any of its stations, and are not necessarily endorsed by TPR.If your organization hosts lectures, book readings, panel discussions, or presentations and is interested in participating, email HearSA curator, Nathan Cone at ncone [at] tpr dot org

Where The Water Comes From

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Removing one Cedar tree from your property can keep 40 gallons of water in the ground per day; that's 14,600 gallons per year of a resource that is becoming less and less available as much of the state continues to be in drought conditions.  This statistic was read off by Dr. Tom Arsuffi at the March 8th meeting of the Texas Water Symposium entitled Texas Springs: Making Connections between Groundwater, Surface Water, Science and Stewardship at the Llano Field Campus of Texas Tech University in Junction, Texas. 

The meeting brought together landowners, scientists, and advocates for conservation to talk about Land Stewardship practices that were working and increasing the flow of water.  

The Presentation Consists of: 

  • Dr. Tom Arsuffi from Texas Tech
  • Edwards County Judge Souli Shanklin, Moderator and landowner
  • David Langford, Tom Vandivier and Ruthie Russell spoke on Stewarship Practices
  • Dr. Robert Mace from the Texas Water Development Board