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The KPAC Blog features classical music news, reviews, and analysis from South Texas and around the world. To listen to KPAC 88.3 FM, simply open the player in the gray ribbon at the top of this page and choose KPAC: Classical Music.

Symphony And YOSA Team Up To Tackle Dvorak's 'Serenade For Strings'

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Youth Orchestras of San Antonio
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Troy Peters directs YOSA.

Many classical music organizations are participating in the city-wide Dvořák Festival, and the Youth Orchestras of San Antonio are doing so too. YOSA Music Director Troy Peters has the lowdown.

"We are working with the Children’s Chorus of San Antonio and also with musicians from the San Antonio Symphony" he explained. "So we’ll have a string orchestra of students and professionals playing together, playing the great Dvořák 'Serenade for Strings.' And then we’re also going to do a nice little set of choral music with the Children’s Chorus of San Antonio."

YOSA’s goal of changing lives through music gets quite a boost by this particular event. The reason: Select members of the San Antonio Symphony are sitting in and mentoring with them for this performance.

"The string orchestra is going to be comprised of twenty students and twenty professional musicians, so you have this one-to-one ratio, so they’ll be right next to one another," Peters said.

The January 26 performance at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church downtown promises to be quite difficult, and quite interesting.

"For the audiences it should be a great chance to see the energy of youth paired with the polish of the professional musicians," Peters said.

Between the symphony’s Dvořák Festival, Camerata San Antonio and now YOSA, Dvořák is really getting a city-wide workout.

"All of this Dvořák focus means that we play all of it with more understanding, and more nuance, and Dvořák is really a lovable composer" said Peters. "I mean, you’d really have to be a curmudgeon not to enjoy Dvořák."