refugees | Texas Public Radio

refugees

Megan Zerez for KERA News

On Fronteras:

  • A San Antonio-based nonprofit steps up to assist asylum seekers and refugees going through the appeals process in immigration court (00:15).
  • Refugees making their new homes in Texas share their food culture through community gardens (16:38).


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This week on Fronteras:

  • Reaction to Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s decision to sue the federal government over ending DACA (0:15).
  • Vice President Mike Pence visits the border wall on the California-Mexico border (1:43).
  • The number of refugees resettling in Texas is declining (3.28).
  • Marfa mural preserves the city’s story for the future (9:10).
  • Author Bill Neeley shares the story of San Antonio Texas revolutionary hero Juan Seguín (12:38).


H. Drew Galloway

On this episode of Fronteras:

  • Students from the University of Texas at San Antonio look to address the needs of undocumented students.
  • San Antonio students find support at UTSA’s Dreamers Resource Center, which provides assistance to undocumented students (3:12).
  • Asylum seekers are being denied their legal rights at U.S. detention centers (13:35).
  • Thousands of refugees take advantage of a legal loophole to cross the northern border from the U.S. to Canada (16:32).


Enrique Cerna / KCTS 9

This week on Fronteras:

  • Immigrant rights activists  in San Diego protest Congress’ inaction on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
  • A San Antonio charter school aims to increase rate of students who go on to earn college degrees (1:46).
  • A Dallas high school offers low-income and refugee students a crash course in financial literacy (5:51).
  • The push by a national organization to recruit Hispanic nurses (10:45).

The Trump administration plans to cap the number of refugees the U.S. will accept next year at 45,000. That is a dramatic drop from the level set by the Obama administration and would be the lowest number in years.

The White House formally announced its plans in a report to congressional leaders Wednesday, as required by law.

The number of refugees the U.S. admits has fluctuated over time. But this cap is the lowest that any White House has sought since the president began setting the ceiling on refugee admissions in 1980.

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