National Guard | Texas Public Radio

National Guard

Federal law protects the civilian jobs of National Guard and Reserve troops when they deploy. But federal employees allege the government itself doesn't always follow the law.

A thousand National Guard troops from Texas will try to address one of the unintended results of President Trump’s immigration crackdown -- traffic jams that are slowing international commerce.

The Government Accountability Office says the military isn't doing enough to deal with the effects of climate change, after more than $9 billion in hurricane and flood-related damage to three bases in less than a year.

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This week on Fronteras, National Guard troops arrive on the border, and students expand their knowledge of Mexican food culture through “taco literacy”’

  • President Trump has called for National Guard members to deploy to the U.S.-Mexico border. Troops are making their way into South Texas (0:00).
  • Tarrant County partners with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to enforce immigration law (4:28).
  • A mural of a Mexican abuela peers down on the West Texas border town of Presidio (9:00).
  • Students gain insight into Mexican-American culture through “taco Literacy” (12:47).


From Texas Standard.

About 250 Texas National Guard troops have deployed to the Texas-Mexico border. Texas’ Gov. Greg Abbott says he’ll eventually send more than 1,000. But even with the state’s leadership so supportive of any appearance of cracking down on illegal immigration, are the Guard troops really doing immigration enforcement? And how do folks who already work on border law enforcement perceive the influx of military personnel?

David Martin Davies / TPR News

The first members of the National Guard in Texas have made their way to the U.S-Mexico border following a call to action by President Trump. The Laredo border patrol sector says it would welcome the help.

The Laredo section of the Texas-Mexico border spans 170 miles and contains no walls or fences.

Border Patrol Chief Greg Burwell said it's a challenge to keep tabs on all of it.

Kevin Ziober says he was illegally fired because he served in Afghanistan. His employer is forcing him to take his complaint to binding arbitration, rather than to court.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A clash between Muslim inmates and the female soldiers assigned to guard them has led to a standoff at the lockup in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

A judge has blocked female guards from shackling and escorting five Muslim men being tried for plotting the Sept. 11 attacks. Soldiers, in turn, have filed Equal Opportunity complaints against the judge.

Walter Ruiz is the lawyer for one of the Guantanamo detainees who object to being escorted by female guards.

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