heart disease | Texas Public Radio

heart disease

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Two hundred and thirty five graduation certificates were served up with mashed potatoes and green beans at a local cafeteria Tuesday. It was the largest class of over-60s to graduate from the Senior Planet program in San Antonio. Courses teach computer basics, social media and connecting online. Classes try to tackle social isolation among seniors with internet skills.

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Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. What should you know to keep your heart strong and disease free? 


Jessica A DuVernay/U.S. Army

Peripheral artery disease is a lesser-known chronic circulatory condition with potentially fatal consequences if left unchecked.


From Texas Standard.

It’s Valentine’s Day and so we put together a story for you about hearts – not candy hearts or even those filled with chocolate, but human hearts. These days, we know quite a bit about them. It’s been 50 years since the first successful transplant. But, in a way, hearts are also still full of mystery – and I’m not trying to get romantic on you. A doctor in Dallas is trying to solve those mysteries of the heart by studying the organs that no one wants anymore.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT News

This week on Fronteras:

  • Border Patrol agents go through extremes on the job, ranging from extreme boredom to high-stress situations. 0:00
  • Some immigrant laborers who responded to Harvey don’t get paid.  4:05

  • Bi-partisan support in Texas for new DREAM Act legislation to protect recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program from deportation.  5:43

  • A study on discrimination shows many Latinos weren’t encouraged to pursue higher education. 8:20

  • A  binational study of heart disease is looking at how it affects people of Mexican ancestry. 13:23


Can Working Too Hard Give You A Stroke?

Oct 3, 2016

From Texas Standard:

In 2001, Jonas Koffler was working for a tech startup in Austin. He was 26 years old, ambitious, and climbing the company ladder by working over 70 hours a week. He'd work around the clock, taking cat naps rather than logging a full night's sleep.

He was happy to do it, too. His hard work, it seemed, was getting results. And then – suddenly – everything stopped. One moment he was giving a presentation; the next, he was in a hospital. He'd had a stroke. The doctors told him that the stress and overexertion from his work may have helped cause it.

 


Kim Stewart

We’ve all heard stories about healthy young athletes who trot onto the football field and die from an undetected heart problem. A San Antonio foundation wants to keep those sudden deaths from claiming young lives. Thousands of teens are lining up for tests that could change their lives, or even save their lives.

Jake Stewart of San Antonio has already had a lot of success on the football field playing for Clark High School. This year, the 17-year-old is heading into his senior year serving as the Cougars quarterback.

San Antonio resident Candace Stark had never heard of Chagas Disease until she was told she had it.

“About July 2013, I went to donate blood. About six months later I got a letter with the lab report showing I had the antibodies,” she said.

The next problem for Candace was finding a doctor who knew how to deal with Chagas.

“The first one didn’t know much about it himself and sent me to a second one, and he was having to read up on it out of the books,” she said.

Doctors are now playing catch up.

Millions of Americans take baby aspirin every day to prevent a heart attack or stroke. If they are at high risk of heart disease, they're doing the right thing, according to draft recommendations issued Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Are you not getting enough sleep, or are you getting too much? If your answer to either of these questions is "yes," you may be at risk of heart disease.

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