Country Music | Texas Public Radio

Country Music

The country trio Dixie Chicks have changed the group's name to The Chicks in an apparent distancing from a name associated with the Confederate-era South.

In a world starved of roars of applause, hollers from excitable concertgoers and the warm, worn acoustics of venerated music venues, Margo Price has shared a relic of times gone by with her new live album, Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman.

Steve Earle knows how to tell a story. Talking to him is a whirlwind of names and places, moments that changed him, songs that moved him, lots of laughs, sharp observations and little bits of wisdom. He's someone who knows the value of storytelling as a way to find our shared humanity.

April 22 is Earth Day around the world, and Kacey Musgraves is celebrating with new music. Sort of: Early Wednesday morning, she released "Oh, What A World 2.0" — a reworked version of a song from 2018's Golden Hour — on her YouTube channel, alongside a fundraiser for the World Wildlife Fund.

At least initially, Musgraves peels off some of the instrumentation from the album version, and sings the opening verse — which is most directly about natural wonder — over a simple finger-picked guitar accompaniment.

DJ Sessions: Nashville Honky Tonk

Apr 17, 2020

J. Patrick Tinnell of WSM in Nashville shares some favorite honky tonk music and his hopes to hear it coming out of Nashville’s downtown joints again.

Music From The Segment

Hank Williams, “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”

Watch on YouTube.

Loretta Lynn, “Honky Tonk Girl”

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Lefty Frizzell, “If You’ve Got The Money, I’ve Got The Time”

"Entirely Different Stars," from Lukas Nelson's newest album, Naked Garden, is a song many people might relate to right about now. It's a fantasy about grabbing that special someone and blasting off to a less troubled planet.

Remembering Houston Native Kenny Rogers

Mar 24, 2020

From Texas Standard:

He was a Texas native, but wasn't really known as a Texas musician. He was "country," but he was also a big part of the pop music world. And he was a solo artist whose biggest hit was a duet. Kenny Rogers was an artist who wore many, sometimes contradictory, hats. He died Friday at the age of 81.

Country music icon Kenny Rogers, whose hits included "Lucille," "Lady" and "The Gambler," died late Friday at his home in Sandy Springs, Ga., his family said in a statement. He was 81.

The Houston-born country star had 20 No.-1 hits and three Grammys and performed for some 60 years before retiring from touring in 2017 at age 79, according to the Associated Press.

Rogers didn't write most of his hits and often said he didn't consider himself much of a songwriter. But he told NPR in 2012 that he had a knack for picking songs that could draw in the listener.

YouTube

Don't tell Margo Price she can't make a rock and roll record, because she will get into an L.A.

Donning floral gasmasks and brandishing liberty torches against an apocalyptic, ombré pink landscape, Natalie Maines, Emily Strayer and Martie Maguire look ready for battle. And that's just the promotional photo.

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