Brownsville | Texas Public Radio

Brownsville

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Thousands of asylum seekers in Matamoros, Mexico, across the Rio Grande from Brownsville, don’t have access to clean water. They have to use the Rio Grande for bathing, washing clothes and cooling off from the blistering heat. Migrants have developed skin infections, and some have drowned. But a group of volunteers is trying to make their lives better.


Yulisa stands at the international bridge that connect Brownsville and Matamoros around 4 a.m.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

The ACLU filed a complaint last week against the Department of Homeland Security for turning away pregnant asylum seekers.


Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

Residents in the Rio Grande Valley gathered at vigils in McAllen and Brownsville on Sunday evening to remember the lives of Oscar Alberto Martinez Ramirez and his 23-month-old daughter, Angie Valeria.

The Salvadoran father and daughter drowned as they tried to cross the river between Matamoros and Brownsville last Sunday. Valeria’s mother, Tania Vanessa Avalos, watched as her family was swept away.

From Texas Standard:

Brownsville, Texas, is one of the poorest metropolitan areas in the nation. But it is now being considered for almost $40 billion worth of investment. Three energy companies are planning projects to bring liquefied natural gas plants to the area – striking community controversy and organized opposition to the proposals.

 

Oscar Casares is known for his short story collection, "Brownsville," a publication that has become a new classic about life in this border city. 

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

More than 76,000 people were apprehended or surrendered on the Southern border in February and administration officials project that number would surpass 100,000 for March.

The highest number of crossings are taking place in Texas' Rio Grande Valley.


A planned liquefied natural gas facility near Brownsville would boost energy export opportunities, but also poses a risk to Texas ocelots.

Marlon Lizama

Despite a strong Hispanic presence, not much Mexican-American history is being taught in public schools along the border — that is, until now.  

  • On this episode of Fronteras, students in El Paso are learning more about a previously unknown chapter of history (0:17).
  • Also on this episode, a SpaceX facility in Brownsville has yet to be completed but residents there are worried if the company’s promises of a launch facility will go unfulfilled (5:34).
  • And finally, Houston poet and performer Marley Lizama talks about how his mother’s unconventional punishments led him to poetry, and how hip hop helped him find his voice (10:57).


John Allen Rubio sits on Death Row in Texas. He was convicted of the 2003 murder of three children that were in his care. Rubio with his common law wife Angela Camacho say they believed the children were possessed by the devil. Prosecutors say Rubio committed the murders because they were homeless and so poor he didn’t want to take care of them any longer. The murder shocked the border community of Brownsville at the time and it’s a news story that’s still remembered. But former Brownsville Herald reporter Laura Tillman wanted to go deeper in the telling of this crime.

The space company SpaceX has identified a remote spot on the southern tip of Texas as its finalist for construction of the world's newest commercial orbital launch site.

The 50-acre site really is at the end of the road. Texas Highway 4 abruptly ends at the warm waves of the Gulf surrounded by cactus, Spanish dagger and sand dunes.

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