African American History | Texas Public Radio

African American History

America’s origin story is often depicted as an optimistic struggle toward equality with citizens who will one day be united by culture and identity. In reality, the tale of America is nuanced; a history full of internal conflict and forgotten narratives.


Dallas Williams/ Texas Public Radio

The foundation of one of the first Black churches in San Antonio was discovered in February during construction of the San Pedro Creek Culture Park project.


Copyright (c) 2013- 2018, Jeffrey Gusky, All Rights Reserved.

The COVID-19 pandemic is not the first time humanity has been devastated by disease. History reminds us of our most challenging moments but also how we’ve managed to persevere.

Dr. Jeff Gusky discovered the remnants of an almost forgotten African American combat unit whose members volunteered to serve after white troops were decimated by disease in the Spanish American War.

Dominic Anthony Walsh | Texas Public Radio

UPDATE: Early Friday evening, Gov. Greg Abbott signed a bill allowing the state of Texas to sell the Sutton Building to a private developer. 

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Researchers and students from Texas A&M University at San Antonio used ground-penetrating radar to examine a rediscovered African American cemetery. The site was linked to historic black settlements on the north side of the city.

The Institute of Texan Cultures

On Fronteras:

  • San Antonio’s African-American history is often overshadowed by those who fought for Texas independence. Aundar Ma’at and Born Logic Allah are working to add to the narrative of the city’s history with their documentary, ‘Walk on the River: A Black History of the Alamo City’ (0:16).
  • And Texas Public Radio’s Ryan Poppe reports on one professor’s effort to identify and preserve historic black settlements (15:55).


Melaneyes Media

African Americans make up about 7 percent of San Antonio’s population, but they have made rich contributions to the fabric of the Alamo City.

Born Logic Allah, director and co-producer of “Walk on the River: A Black History of the Alamo City," said one of the most important educational figures was Dolores B. Linton, who made something out of nothing for black children living on the west side of San Antonio.

NORMA MARTINEZ / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO; JOHN MOORE / GETTY IMAGES; KARL JACOBY; CREATIVE CIVILIZATION ADVERTISING

This is our year in review.

  • A Mexican-American literature course at a local high school (0:21)
  • Regrets of a former Border Patrol agent (2:43)
  • The hidden African-American history of San Antonio (4:46)
  • A granddaughter of a Nazi (7:09)
  • The dangers of reporting from the border (10:13)
  • The descendants of the victims of a 100-year-old massacre (13:17)
  • A former Texas slave who became a Mexican millionaire (17:17)