Wendy Rigby | Texas Public Radio

Wendy Rigby

Bioscience and Medicine Reporter

Wendy Rigby is a San Antonio native who has worked as a journalist for more than 25 years. She spent two decades at KENS-TV covering health and medical news. Now, she brings her considerable background, experience and passion to Texas Public Radio.

Wendy has earned dozens of awards for medical reporting from various state and national organizations including the Texas Medical Association, the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, and the Dallas Press Club. She has been honored with two Emmy Awards from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Wendy earned her Bachelor’s degree in Print and Broadcast Journalism from Trinity University in San Antonio. She graduated summa cum laude.

She lives in San Antonio with her husband. Wendy has two adult children and a menagerie of pets. She enjoys music, reading, watching movies, cross-stitching and travel.

Wendy left TPR in September, 2017 and now works for Texas BioMed.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the BioScience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, The John and Rita Feik Foundation, The John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

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Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

You’ve probably noticed it in grocery stores and restaurants…a trend toward healthier food offerings with fewer calories, less fat and less sugar. As part of the changing food scene in America, chefs in training are learning how to make dishes that are good for you taste good.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

We don’t think much about malaria in the United States, but worldwide, the parasite transmitted by mosquitoes infects more than 200 million people.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Infertility can be heartbreaking for many couples struggling to have their own biological children. Some scientists at the University of Texas at San Antonio are trying to understand the mystery of male infertility. And they’re conducting their research one cell at a time.

Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital

The first successful living donor kidney transplant took place in 1984. Since that time, more than 50,000 people have had one of their two kidneys removed and implanted in someone who needed that organ to live.

In today’s TPR Lifeline, Bioscience-Medicine Reporter Wendy Rigby talks with Adam Bingaman, MD, of Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital in San Antonio about the need for more kidney donors.

BioMed SA

The nonprofit group BioMed SA chose a Florida bioengineer as the recipient of its 2017 Award for Innovation Healthcare and Bioscience. His inventions have impacted millions.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The misuse of prescription drugs is on the rise in the U-S, fueling the growing opioid epidemic. That’s why disposing of unused medications the right way is so important.

This weekend, MedDropSA is hosting a drug drop off event. It’s Saturday from 8 until 1 at Alamo City Christian Fellowship Church, 6500 Interstate 35 North.

You must present a picture ID and a recent copy of your CPS bill to qualify to use the service.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Of the 20 locally-acquired cases of Chagas disease in 2016 in Texas, Bexar County had the most. Chagas disease is caused by a parasite carried by kissing bugs. This rare condition is now catching the attention of the local medical community.

Lyssa Ochoa, MD

Vascular surgeons say Peripheral Artery Disease – or P.A.D. – is one of the most underdiagnosed medical conditions in America. If left untreated, it can cause major mobility problems, or it can even be fatal. In today’s TPR Lifeline, Bioscience-Medicine reporter Wendy Rigby talks to Lyssa Ochoa, MD, a vascular surgeon with Peripheral Vascular Associates in San Antonio.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The public is invited to a free public forum on Latino Health in San Antonio Tuesday night.

The UT Health San Antonio School of Nursing is hosting the event.

Topics range from access to health care, issues for Latinos within the health care system, and the stigmas some Latinos face when they seek help.

Anyone is welcome to attend the free forum  at 5:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Menger Hotel.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Some San Antonio scientists are developing a new drug that could help save the lives of women whose breast cancer comes back. Recurrent tumors are common and often deadly. This new agent is showing great promise.

A noisy centrifuge, a carefully controlled incubator, a bench full of busy scientists working on cancer cell lines -- all can be found in a lab is where basic science and medical need intersect.

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