Mallory Falk | Texas Public Radio

Mallory Falk

Mallory Falk was WWNO's first Education Reporter. Her four-part series on school closures received an Edward R. Murrow award. Prior to joining WWNO, Mallory worked as Communications Director for the youth leadership non-profit Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools. She fell in love with audio storytelling as a Middlebury College Narrative Journalism Fellow and studied radio production at the Transom Story Workshop.

When a Salvadoran woman grabbed her 4-year-old daughter and fled their home country in February, the coronavirus wasn't yet a global pandemic.

By the time they reached the U.S.-Mexico border a month later, that had changed. She crossed the Rio Grande, planning to ask for asylum. But Border Patrol agents took her and her daughter right back to Mexico, despite her pleas.

Copyright 2020 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

It all happened so fast. An asylum seeker and her two young daughters had just crossed the border between El Paso and Ciudad Juárez when they encountered immigration officials.

Paul Ratje for KERA News

A public health order issued in late-March by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention barred unauthorized migrants from entering the U.S. The order cited concerns over the “introduction” of an infectious disease to the country, which in this case, is COVID-19. What was an initial effort to contain the spread of the pandemic has since thrown the U.S. asylum process into disarray.

Three reporters — from the Rio Grande Valley, El Paso and Mexico City — took a deep dive on how this CDC order affects the lives of asylum-seeking migrants by examining how it’s being implemented along the Texas-Mexico border.

 

For weeks, Emma Chalott Barron had been riddled with anxiety, wondering how the U.S. Supreme Court would rule on the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

As the number of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. continues to climb, medical experts are turning their attention to immigration detention centers. 

A sign telling visitors at St. David’s Medical Center in Austin to alert staff if they’ve traveled to a region with cases of COVID-19 and have certain respiratory symptoms.
Julia Reihs | KUT

El Paso health officials confirmed the first presumptive positive case of COVID-19 in the area late Friday. 

Peter O'Dowd / Fronteras

Social visitation is suspended in all U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facilities according to a statement from officials. The agency did not provide further specifics about measures to prevent or mitigate the impact of COVID-19, but said it is “taking important steps to further safeguard those in our care.”

When presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders held a recent campaign rally in El Paso, it made sense to kick things off with the beloved local band Sparta. 

The group played a few songs as people took their seats in a downtown concert hall. Then frontman Jim Ward addressed the crowd.

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