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Fleeing violence in Mexico, one Honduran family decided to cross into the U.S. illegally last month and turn themselves over to Border Patrol agents in the desert near San Diego.

The father and son were immediately returned to the border and told to walk back to Tijuana, but the mother, who was pregnant, was in pain. So Border Patrol agents took her to a nearby hospital, where she gave birth.

Two days later, the mother was given a choice: Go back to Mexico with or without her newborn, who is a U.S. citizen by birthright.

Guatemala's Health Minister Hugo Monroy says migrants deported back to Guatemala from the United States now account for a large number of COVID-19 cases in the country.

Monroy made the statement on Tuesday as deportation flights resumed after a one-week suspension in the wake of the discovery of three cases of returned migrants infected with the virus.

After a 10-month odyssey from a Honduran slum to a North Texas suburb, 17-year-old Marvin Joel Zelaya takes a sip from his first vanilla Frappuccino and marvels at his new surroundings.

"There's order, there's security," he says. "There's not so much poverty and delinquency."

Zelaya is living with a relative in the antiseptic suburbs that extend from Dallas to Fort Worth. He is going to high school and waiting for his first asylum hearing in June.

A new report by Physicians for Human Rights documents evidence of lasting psychological harm for migrant children and parents subjected to the Trump Administration's family separation policy, which was intended to dissuade migration to the nation's southern border.


File Photo| Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued an emergency stay late Monday night, blocking the deportation of a 5-year-old Guatemalan boy until the court can hear his case.

The move puts a hold on an earlier ruling, which would have allowed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to deport the boy and his family.

Hundreds of migrants from Central America on Monday moved off a closed border bridge and waded across the Suchiate River at the Guatemala-Mexico border after Mexican officials informed the group they would not be permitted to move farther into the country.

With the river low from the dry season, migrants were able to cross but were met with the Mexico's National Guard lining the river's banks on the other side.

For a moment, Jesus thought his ordeal was coming to an end. Three months after fleeing Venezuela, he got his chance to tell a judge how he and his mother escaped political persecution.

"The judge asked me three questions," Jesus said in Spanish through an interpreter. "What's your nationality? Why did you leave your country? Why can't you go back?"

In his annual Christmas Day address, Pope Francis offered a message of hope and a call for kindness to migrants around the world.

"May the Son of God, come down to earth from heaven, protect and sustain all those who, due to these and other injustices, are forced to emigrate in the hope of a secure life," the pontiff said from the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica.

Updated at 11:34 p.m. ET

A government internal watchdog said there was no wrongdoing or misconduct by Department of Homeland Security officials in the deaths of two migrant children last December, according to two reports released late Friday.

Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández (@crimmigration), author of “Migrating to Prison: America’s Obsession With Locking Up Immigrants.”

Book Excerpt: ‘Migrating To Prison’

By César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández

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