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concussion

It was a question about soccer that got Philip Bayly interested in brain injuries.

Bayly, a mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis, was approached by several doctors who wanted advice about some young soccer players they were treating.

"They said, 'Well, we've got some kids who have concussions and they want to know if they can go back to play. And we don't know what's happening to their head when they're heading a soccer ball,' " Bayly recalls.

A single season playing football might be all it takes to change a young athlete's brain.

Those are the preliminary findings of research presented this week in Chicago at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

Researchers used special MRI methods to look at nerve bundles in the brain in a study of the brains of 26 young male football players, average age 12, before and after one season. Twenty-six more young males who didn't play football also got MRI scans at the same time to be used as a control group.

With Meghna Chakrabarti

NASCAR great Dale Earnhardt Jr. opens up about concussions, fears and why he put the brakes on his storied career.

Courtesy of NOCSAE

Leaders in sports safety gathered Friday in San Antonio to field questions about new equipment standards for sports, including football, baseball and lacrosse.

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment is a non-profit that funds research into sports-related injuries and medicine.

They determined that certain rotational forces contribute to concussions during football. This year, NOCSAE issued new guidance for football helmets based on that information.

Public Domain / Pixabay

About 20 percent of teens have been diagnosed with one concussion, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Concussions, Kids And Contact Sports

Aug 15, 2017

From the NFL to Pop Warner, we know the danger of concussions now. Should kids play football?

There's growing evidence that a physical injury to the brain can make people susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Concussions have become part of the daily news. But how much have these brain injuries become part of daily life?

To find out, we asked people across the country about concussions in the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll.

The poll, conducted during the first half of March, found that nearly a quarter of people — 23 percent of those surveyed — said they had suffered a concussion at some point in their lives. Among those who said they'd had a concussion, more than three-quarters had sought medical treatment.

People who sustain a concussion or a more severe traumatic brain injury are likely to have sleep problems that continue for at least a year and a half.

On Monday, a U.S. Court of Appeals upheld a class action settlement between the National Football League and 20,000 former NFL players. The settlement means retired players can receive between $90,000 and $5 million, depending on the extent of their injuries.

But a small group of players isn’t happy with the deal, and they plan to continue legal action. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Curt Nickisch, senior editor at the Harvard Business Review, about the court’s action and what may happen next.

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