Fronteras: A Black History Of The Alamo City; Texas Freedom Colonies | Texas Public Radio

Fronteras: A Black History Of The Alamo City; Texas Freedom Colonies

Feb 22, 2019

On Fronteras:

  • San Antonio’s African-American history is often overshadowed by those who fought for Texas independence. Aundar Ma’at and Born Logic Allah are working to add to the narrative of the city’s history with their documentary, ‘Walk on the River: A Black History of the Alamo City’ (0:16).
  • And Texas Public Radio’s Ryan Poppe reports on one professor’s effort to identify and preserve historic black settlements (15:55).


Aundar Ma’at, producer, and Born Logic Allah, co-producer and director, of the documentary, ‘Walk on the River: A Black History of the Alamo City.’
Credit Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

‘Walk On The River’: San Antonio’s African-American History, ‘It’s Written All Over The City’

In the era immediately following the abolition of slavery in Texas and the beginning of Jim Crow, African Americans were deeply caught in the shadow of segregation. They struggled and succeeded in buying land, establishing communities, creating businesses, establishing schools, and becoming a political and social force.

Ma’at, producer, and Allah, co-producer and director, trace back San Antonio’s history to this time and discovered significant contributions African Americans made to the development of the city.

They worked hard to create businesses, open  entertainment venues, and educate their children. Phillis Wheatley High School, in particular, helped mold the minds and bodies of young African Americans from across the Alamo City, and they spoke with several individuals who experienced it first-hand.

FRONTERAS EXTRA: San Antonio's African American Legacy

The filmmakers are currently in the midst of a crowdfunding campaign to complete production on a sequel to the film ‘Walk on the River 2.0,’ which will cover San Antonio and Bexar County history dating back to the colonization of the Americas.

Andrea Roberts, professor of urban planning and leader of the Texas Freedom Colonies Project at Texas A&M University.
Credit Texas A&M University

Texas A&M Professor's Research Highlights Significance Of Texas Freedom Colonies

During the years after the Civil War, African-American communities worked together throughout Southeastern Texas to form what historians call freedom colonies. Texas Public Radio’s Ryan Poppe reports on one professor’s effort to identify and preserve these historic black settlements.

Norma Martinez can be reached at norma@tpr.org and on Twitter @NormDog1 and Lauren Terrazas can be reached at lauren@tpr.org and on Twitter @terrazas_lauren.