Colin Dwyer | Texas Public Radio

Colin Dwyer

Trish doesn't have many places to turn. She's living at her elderly father's home without a job because she can't afford the care he needs. And every day she says the balance sheet seems stained with more red ink.

"It's all outgoing. There's nothing coming in, that's for sure. And I'm stuck in a rock and a hard place because of my credit, so I don't — I need to make enough money that I can afford to live somewhere," she says, voice quavering.

Across from her at the table, David Perez nods quietly and takes notes.

Updated at 11:25 p.m. ET

The St. Louis Blues beat the Boston Bruins 4-1 in Boston to claim their first Stanley Cup championship in franchise history.

The Blues scored twice in the first period despite being outplayed for much of that time. Boston outshot St. Louis 12-4 in the first period, but the Bruins were unable to get one past Blues rookie goaltender Jordan Binnington. He ended game with 32 saves.

Linda Fairstein, the longtime New York City prosecutor turned prolific crime novelist, is no longer with her publisher after a firestorm of criticism erupted over her work in a famous — and recently dramatized — trial three decades ago.

Dutton, an imprint of Penguin Random House, confirmed to NPR that it and Fairstein "have decided to terminate their relationship." A spokesperson for Dutton declined to offer any further details on the decision.

Just about eight months after Barnes & Noble revealed it was exploring a possible sale, the embattled bookseller has settled on a buyer.

The mega-chain, which boasts 627 locations across the U.S., announced Friday that the Elliott Management Corp. has agreed to buy Barnes & Noble for about $683 million — a price tag that includes the bookseller's debt, which Elliott will take on as part of the deal.

Less than two months after Tayari Jones won the Aspen Words Literary Prize, the American author has claimed a new laurel: the Women's Prize for Fiction. The judges selected her novel An American Marriage at a ceremony Tuesday night in London, singling it out for praise and a purse of nearly $40,000.

Tony Horwitz, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, historian and author whose books have graced best-seller lists and college syllabuses, has died at the age of 60. His publisher confirmed to NPR that he died Monday without warning, suffering an apparent cardiac arrest while in Washington, D.C., on tour for his most recent book.

Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET

A new pilot is set to take the helm at the Smithsonian Institution.

When the St. Louis Blues take the ice Monday, they may look a little green. This series against the Boston Bruins marks the first time the franchise has skated in a Stanley Cup Final since 1970. In other words, nearly two and a half decades before their rookie goaltender, Jordan Binnington, was even born.

Binyavanga Wainaina, the deeply influential Kenyan writer credited with founding the literary magazine and collective Kwani? and advancing the fight for LGBTQ rights in Africa, has died at the age of 48. The Caine Prize for African Writing, which Wainaina won in 2002, confirmed his death in a statement Wednesday.

Anita Hill has never really been one for compromise.

The lawyer's decision not to do so first propelled her into public life nearly three decades ago, when she came forward with sexual harassment allegations against Clarence Thomas in his 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings. And she doesn't intend to begin compromising now.

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