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Comal County Crews Recover Body Of Rebecca Creek Flood Victim

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Jack Morgan
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Heavy rains caused Cibolo Creek to flood at the dam on Friday.

After a two-day search, emergency crews recovered the body of 52-year-old David Bruce Giller, who was washed into Rebecca Creek by floodwaters on Friday morning.  His vehicle was found unoccupied Friday evening.

Teams from Bulverde/Spring Branch Fire and EMS, Comal County Sheriff’s Office, Texas Department of Public Safety and several other local agencies conducted an intensive search through rugged terrain until Giller’s body was recovered Sunday afternoon. He is the only known fatality in the county from Friday’s flash flooding.

According to a Comal County news release, the flood along the Guadalupe River and Cibolo Creek watersheds has caused more than $1 million in damage. However, the total is likely to rise as property owners continue to submit reports, said Jeff Kelley, emergency management coordinator.

So far, damage estimates include only damage and debris clearance for public areas. With River Road closed since Sunday, businesses were hit hard economically, with damages being reported at about $1.5 million, according to the release.

Comal County residents with damage to their residences should submit a report online by visiting here. “We want to make sure we have an accurate assessment of the damage done in Comal County so we can make as full a report as possible to the state,” Kelley said. “If flooding has caused damage to your residence, we want to know about it.”

At the peak of the flooding Friday morning, about 14,000 homes were isolated by floodwaters, Kelley said, of which about 200 were affected by flooding, including more than 40 that suffered major damage.

River Road was reopened this morning, although a low water crossing just north of Loop 337 remains closed because water continues to flow across it.