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Civil War
00000174-b11b-ddc3-a1fc-bfdbb1a20000The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes focusing on events from 1861 through 1865. The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation. Let us know what you think about "This Week in the Civil War." E-mail your comments to Dr. John Huddleston at jhuddles@schreiner.edu.Airs: Weekdays at 5:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 4:19 p.m. on KTXI and 4:49 a.m., 9:29 p.m. on KSTX.

This Week in the Civil War - 545

The Confederate Congress and President Jefferson Davis sometimes disagreed on policy matters, but on Friday, April 10, 1863 Davis concurred with congressional opposition to the planting of cotton and tobacco, acknowledging:

“Let fields be devoted exclusively to the production of corn, oats, beans, peas, potatoes, and other food for man and beast; let corn be sown broadcast for fodder ...and let all your efforts be directed to the prompt supply of these articles in the districts where our armies are operating.” 

While acknowledging the critical need for foodstuffs, Davis nevertheless expressed optimism in his statement, noting: "Alone, unaided, we have met and overthrown the most formidable combination of naval and military armaments that the lust of conquest ever gathered together for the subjugation of a free people."