Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Texas Education Service Center Curriculum Collaborative (TESCCC)

On Friday a Burnet County judge will decide if Llano ISD can continue to use the CSCOPE lesson plans for the start of this school year.

The decision could have an effect on what happens in school districts across the state as educators and districts struggle with how to meet state standards for education without a curriculum framework that was tailored to meet those marks.

State of Texas

State Board of Education member Thomas Ratliff, who is a Republican, has backed the use of online lesson plan provider CSCOPE from the beginning, but the groups making the push to impeach are not using that as their reason to oust him.

"They allege that because I represent Microsoft as a paid lobbyist at the Texas Legislature that that somehow disqualifies me or gives me a conflict of interest on the State Board of Education," Ratliff said.

Dewhurst campaign video

Burnet County Judge Dan Mills has ordered a temporary restraining order to stop the use of CSCOPE, an online curriculum provider, in Llano ISD until a further ruling.

Leticia McCasland and Trevor Dupuy, both former Llano ISD School Board candidates who made ending the CSCOPE lesson plans part of their campaigns, filed a lawsuit to end the use of the curriculum provider in Llano ISD.

Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst praised the judge's order and called a press conference to highlight the temporary dismantling of the controversial online lesson plans.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education (TCLEOSE) is creating the Texas School Marshal Program that passed during the past legislative session, but there is an issue with where the marshals will get their training.

The law takes effect in Sept. for the start of the school year, but TCLEOSE has until Jan. 1, 2014, to finalize the curriculum and find a series of locations willing to teach the course.

CodeHS

Starting this year, all freshmen at San Antonio ISD's Highlands High School will learn how to code computer systems, the first program of its kind in Texas.

The web-based program that Highland is using is called CodeHS, but anyone can sign up to learn to code from home for a monthly access fee. Outside of the basic curriculum, the 400 incoming freshmen at Highlands will be required to take a course to learn the basics of coding.

Pages