Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Reynaldo Leaños Jr.

Border and Immigration Reporter

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. covers immigration and the U.S.-Mexico border for Texas Public Radio.

Prior to joining Texas Public Radio, Reynaldo was a freelance journalist in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas and in New York City. His work has appeared in Public Radio International’s The World and Global Nation, NBC News, NPR’s Latino USA, KUT’s Texas Standard and KUT.

He has an undergraduate degree from Texas State University, where he studied journalism and international studies. Leanos also has a master’s degree from the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, where he specialized in international reporting.

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Jacquelyn Martin / Pool | AP

President Donald Trump visited McAllen Thursday to continue to make his case for more than $5 billion in funding for a wall on the southern border.


Mani Albrecht / Wikimedia Commons | http://bit.ly/2QBvUB9

It’s early evening, and outside the Hidalgo County Republican Party’s office, members are hosting a blood drive. Inside, people are getting ready for the party’s regularly scheduled meeting. Neat rows of chairs are lined up in front of cut-out figures of President Trump and Abraham Lincoln.

Everyone is talking, some just catching up, but the main topic is politics. Specifically, President Trump's scheduled to visit McAllen on Thursday — a visit to further his case for a border wall.


Thousands of troops who were deployed to the border in the fall have left, but the Trump Administration may call for a second deployment of thousands more.

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

The partial government shutdown is entering its third week and it’s not helping the current backlog of immigration cases across the country.

 


Reynaldo Leanos Jr. / Texas Public Radio

The Trump administration deployed 2,800 troops to the Texas-Mexico border in October to confront a migrant caravan moving north from Central America. And by December, most of those soldiers were sent home, but border cities like McAllen are still dealing with the aftermath of the military presence.