same-sex marriage | Texas Public Radio

same-sex marriage

Fifteen years ago, David Wilson and his husband Rob Compton were one of the first same-sex couples to marry in the U.S.

If it had been up to Wilson and Compton, their union would've been recognized years before that. Frustrated by the injustice, both men became plaintiffs in a lawsuit that led to Massachusetts becoming the first state to legalize same-sex marriage on May 17, 2004.

They married in Boston at City Hall and at their church that same day.

United Methodist Church leaders are meeting in St. Louis beginning Saturday to decide whether to lift a ban on LGBTQ clergy and same-sex weddings.

The topic has become increasingly contentious in recent years, as more United Methodist clergy have come out as gay. United Methodists are among the last mainline Protestant denominations to address the issue, and some worry it could cause a major rift in the church.

The Texas Supreme Court on Friday sided with same-sex marriage opponents who argued that the city of Houston should not have extended its benefits policy to married same-sex couples. The court threw out a lower court ruling that had favored the benefits and sent the case back to a lower court.

The benefits policy was enacted by Houston's former, and first openly gay, mayor, Annise Parker, in 2013.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Lawmakers in the Texas Senate have taken up a bill that would allow judges and county clerks to deny marriages to same-sex couples based on their religious beliefs.  Opponents question whether the bill, if enacted, would violate a person’s constitutional rights and whose rights would they be violating?

The bill by State Senator Brian Birdwell, a Granbury Republican, would exempt county clerks from having to draw up a marriage license for a same-sex couple and county judges from performing them, if doing so violated their own religious beliefs.

A day after Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto proposed enshrining same-sex marriage in the traditionally conservative country's constitution, Mexico's Catholic Church said it opposes the move.

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports on All Things Considered that the Church said same-sex marriage "cannot be equated with the marriage of a man and a woman." The country's bishops are calling for lawmakers to "study carefully the effects of same-sex unions on society."

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has introduced new policies that classify members in same-sex marriages as apostates. Their children will not be permitted to be blessed or baptized until they turn 18 and get permission from church leaders.

To obtain that permission, they must disavow the practice of same-sex cohabitation and marriage and must move out of the household.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, is back to work today — saying she will neither authorize such licenses nor stand in the way of her deputies if they wish to do so.

And, the first couple to apply for a license at the county clerk's office Monday — Shannon Wampler and Carmen Collins — walked out the door with one.

Ryan E. Poppe

Attorneys for a pair of same-sex couples that originally sued the state for its ban on same-sex marriage are looking to get paid.  San Antonio Attorney Neel Lane was the lead attorney in the case and said the state owes plaintiff attorneys close to $750 thousand dollars in attorney’s fees and expenses.

Ryan E. Poppe

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The possibility of Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton being held in contempt of court for impeding gay rights diminished Monday after a lawyer said the state agreed to update vital records policies for same-sex couples.

Word of a resolution came only hours after Paxton told U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia — who had ordered Paxton to appear before him later this week — that no "high-ranking government official" should be compelled to personally show up in court barring extraordinary circumstances.

From Texas Standard.

The Texas Legislature officially named Dripping Springs the “Wedding Capital of Texas” this spring. Chances are good that when Texas lawmakers cast their votes for the designation they probably weren’t contemplating the Supreme Court docket. So how is the big wedding industry in the small city of Dripping Springs adjusting?

Kim Hanks owns Whim Hospitality and the wedding venue Camp Lucy. She’s been serving couples in the area for more than a decade.

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