Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

The board of South San ISD is developing plans to open Athens Elementary, which closed in 2017.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The state senators that represent the South San Antonio Independent School District want the Texas Education Agency to appoint a conservator to oversee the district. They are concerned South San trustees aren’t making sound financial decisions.

Edgewood mariachi students perform in the lobby  of the district's performing  arts theater before its first State of the District April 11, 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The Edgewood school district wants to convert many of its neighborhood campuses to specialty schools over the next five years. Superintendent Eduardo Hernández introduced the plan Thursday during the district’s first State of the District presentation.

Texas Tech University's medical school has agreed to end its consideration of race in selecting candidates for admission, an outcome actively sought by the Trump administration.

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center submitted to pressure from the Education Department's Office on Civil Rights, which had conducted a 14-year probe into the use of affirmative action in admission policies at the medical school. The agreement is the first reached by the administration and a school to stop using race as an admissions factor.

The former UT Austin men's tennis coach will plead guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud for receiving money to recruit an unqualified student to the university's tennis team in 2015, the Department of Justice said.

Michael Center was put on administrative leave the day he was indicted on two charges of mail fraud for accepting $60,000 personally in the scheme and was later fired. He also received $40,000 on behalf of the university's tennis program, authorities say.

Wes Scalf, 13, speaks to his mom, Lisa Scalf, in their home in February 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As the first wave of Texas students sit down to take the state standardized test this week, many parents, educators and lawmakers are wondering whether those tests are fair. Some are convinced the answer to that question is no.

Pages