Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Robert Wagstaff of San Antonio died of COVID-19 April  10. He was 30 years old.
Provided | Audrey Wagstaff

Robert Wagstaff died of COVID-19 April 10, before he could finish his accounting degree at Texas A&M University-San Antonio. He was 30 years old.

Family and friends remember him for his gentle spirit and dedication.

Edison High School senior Miranda Treviño sought help from her college bound advisors to support her transition to college.
Provided | Miranda Treviño

When the coronavirus pandemic hit the U.S. in the spring, it robbed many high school seniors of important milestones such as prom and graduation, and robbed them of the chance to say goodbye to their classmates. For some, it also took away their chance to set foot on the campus of the college of their choice for the first time.

A pathway, building and banner on the Our Lady of the Lake University campus on San Antonio's West Side.
File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Our Lady of the Lake University plans to reopen its campuses in San Antonio, Houston and the Rio Grande Valley this fall.

University professors and administrators are still working out the final details, but according to OLLU President Diane Melby changes to course schedules and dorm assignments are underway to enable social distancing when residence halls and classrooms reopen for the fall semester on August 17.

A sign on the campus of St. Philip's College, one of the five community colleges in the Alamo Colleges District.
File Photo | Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

The Alamo Colleges District is waiving tuition for some students this summer to keep them on track towards graduation during the coronavirus pandemic.

Three-quarters of U.S. states have now officially closed their schools for the rest of the academic year. While remote learning continues, summer is a question mark, and attention is already starting to turn to next fall.

Recently, governors including California's Gavin Newsom and New York's Andrew Cuomo have started to talk about what school reopening might look like. And a federal government plan for reopening, according to The Washington Post, says that getting kids back in classrooms or other group care is the first priority for getting back to normal.

Christopher Terrazas, 24, set up a virtual classroom in his family's game room for his daily video lesson with his 6th grade students.
Provided | Christopher Terrazas

Christopher Terrazas never imagined finishing his second year of teaching from a virtual classroom set up in a corner of his family game room at home.

But when the coronavirus pandemic forced schools across the country to close, the 24-year-old San Antonio native embraced the new challenge.

Across Texas, some school districts are now offering teletherapy services to students with disabilities. It's the first large-scale launch of its kind, so teachers and therapists are having to get creative to meet the needs of these students. 

Erin Rodriguez said her son Ricky, 10, misses his friends and Scrabble competitions. She says the coronavirus outbreak been isolating for her three sons, who have autism and find a lot of social connections in school.
Courtesy Erin Rodriguez

At Pin Oak Middle School, Elise Friou gets intensive reading instruction. She’s 13 years old, in sixth grade and has Down syndrome. While her mom Jane Friou says she’s made a lot of progress, Elise still reads somewhere on a second-grade level.

SAISD families line up at Woodlawn Academy on April 9 to pick up laptops for their children to use while schools are closed.
File Photo | Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Independent School District regained contact with more than 5,000 students this past week, cutting the number of students it hasn’t heard from since spring break in half.

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