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Ted Radio Hour
TED Radio Hour
Saturdays from 4 a.m.-5 a.m. and Sundays from noon-1 p.m.

Based on talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme – such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections – and injects soundscapes and conversations that bring these ideas to life.

TED Radio Hour is a co-production of NPR and TED.

About TED:

TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to ideas worth spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 25 years ago, TED has grown into a global platform for identifying and spreading those world-changing ideas.

The annual TED Conference and TEDGlobal Conferences invite the world's leading thinkers and doers to speak for up to 18 minutes. Their talks are then made available, free, at and through TED distribution partners.

  • In 1989, CM Ralph created "Caper in the Castro", the first LGBTQ+ video game. Nearly lost when diskettes became obsolete, this piece of gaming and queer history found new life in the Internet Archive.
  • Humans are generating vast amounts of data each day— and we're running out of storage space. Molecular biologist Dina Zielinski discusses a solution that can pack tons of data into a tiny space: DNA.
  • The internet is forever ... or is it? The average webpage is deleted or changed in just 100 days. To preserve all human knowledge — digital and analog — Brewster Kahle created the Internet Archive.
  • LIDAR technology is an innovation in archeology and ecology that has uncovered lost civilizations. But archeologist Chris Fisher realized it could help track and study the effects of climate change.
  • We often resolve to spend time with family. A.J. Jacobs may have found one solution: treat everyone like family. He says genealogy platforms have linked him to family trees with millions of cousins.
  • Traveling lets us take in the awe of new places. But author and travel writer Pico Iyer realized he could bring an adventurous spirit to familiar spaces and see local beauty that he had overlooked.
  • When it comes to money, knowing better doesn't always help us save more. Wendy De La Rosa suggests changing and automating factors in your environment to take back control of your finances.
  • How often have you resolved to stress less? But what does that mean? For journalist Catherine Price, she found the first step to making us happier, healthier, and more present is to ... have more fun.
  • Dieting doesn't work. Despite that, many people feel immense pressure to starve themselves. Neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt argues for a better, healthier way to live with mindful eating.
  • Did you know working out is the single best thing you can do for your brain? Neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki found regular exercise helps grow your brain, improve memory and help protect against dementia.