HearSA | Texas Public Radio

HearSA


HearSA is an online audio archive of public programming intended to foster discussion and enhance awareness of exciting and informative local presentations and events. The HearSA archive includes lectures, panel discussions, book readings, and much more. Texas Public Radio partners with local organizations to bring a second life online to the most interesting talks in town. Content from HearSA may be selected by Texas Public Radio for broadcast or on-air commentary, providing further exposure for archived program material.

HearSA is presented by Texas Public Radio in association with its local partners. It is important to recognize that the opinions presented in these programs are those of the author or presenter, not Texas Public Radio or any of its stations, and are not necessarily endorsed by TPR.

If your organization hosts lectures, book readings, panel discussions, or presentations and is interested in participating, email HearSA curator, Nathan Cone at ncone [at] tpr dot org

    TPR

    For a quarter of a century, humans have been interacting online through the World Wide Web, and along with the easy access to information have been sea changes in the way we do business, converse, and even fall in love. What influence has the Internet had on the way our minds work? Have we become a nation of “skimmers” that can no longer find time to read a novel? What about the addictive nature of social media, gaming, gambling or even online pornography? How has the Internet changed us?

    Jack Morgan

    The ongoing effects of the Llano River flood, Hurricane Harvey, the Blanco River flood of 2015, and flooding across the state over the past several years have caused loss of life and immense property damage.

    As communities rebuild, questions about how we ensure the safety of all Texans remain.

    Cyle Perez / TPR

    Those nacho-flavored chips you're eating? They probably taste that way because of micro-flavor particles covering the surface. Engines that burn cleaner fuel? Thank nanotechnology. Sports equipment that lasts longer, flies faster... lighter weight material for aerospace and engineering, even biological machines within the human body... Even a decade ago there were over 800 publicly available products that could be classified as using nanotechnology, which is defined as science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers.

     

    Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

    Across the Hill Country, there’s a proliferation of permit applications to discharge treated wastewater directly into Hill Country creeks and rivers. Population increases are putting pressure on utilities to expand services, and many do not have the technical or financial resources to explore non-discharge options. At this Texas Water Symposium panel held on November 8, 2018 at Schreiner University, panelists discuss the implications of wastewater discharge for creek and river health and for the quality of rural well water, and explore the alternatives for the region.

    Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

    The Castro brothers — Joaquin and Julián — were sitting on stage at the Pearl Stable the evening of Oct. 30 for the San Antonio Public Library Foundation’s “Get Lit” series of author interviews.

    Julián Castro was there to talk about his memoir, “An Unlikely Journey.”

    Pages