Yvette Benavides | Texas Public Radio

Yvette Benavides

When Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced his re-election bid, he highlighted many of his accomplishments from his years in office.

What he left out was his indictment on three felony charges. We talk to Texas Observer staff writer Michael Barajas about his case.

Then, a homemade political yard sign caught the attention of Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. So much so, it was seized by police (11:00). And finally, here in Texas, folks opt to observe Indigenous People’s Day rather than Columbus Day (22:52).  


Contributed Photo

Julissa Arce graduated at the top of her high school class in San Antonio and went on to succeed in college, before becoming a star of Wall Street. Arce was vice president for Goldman Sachs by the time she was 27 years old — all this while also being an undocumented immigrant living in fear of being deported. She spoke to Texas Public Radio contributor Yvette Benavides.


There may not be snow in San Antonio but it's still Christmastime in Texas. Sharing your favorite childhood story of the holidays with your own children is a way to keep the spirit of Christmas strong.

On this Texas Matters, we'll visit some Texas Christmas traditions and hear classic stories of the holidays with Texas storyteller John Henry Faulk and San Antonio writer Yvette Benavides.


I need a book doctor.

If you haven’t heard that term before, a book doctor is someone who will take a presumably moribund manuscript, put it on a strict regimen of big picture prescriptions – a look with a tongue depressor down the throat of the thing, shining a light there to see about improving development, structure, organization, and flow. The closer, more surgical examination to get at finer, more granular line edits can go to an editor or proofreader. A book doctor looks at the macroeconomics of these created worlds.

 

Best-selling author Ann Patchett is known for her works of fiction and nonfiction.  Her many acclaimed works include Bel Canto, State of Wonder, Truth and Beauty, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, and many others, including her latest, Commonwealth, her seventh novel, which provides a discerning, sometimes funny, sometimes heart-rending study of sibling and other familial relationships.  Ann Patchett also co-owns Parnassus Books and went into the independent booksellers business when two other bookstores in Nashville closed.

Austin-based author, Elizabeth Harris, brings us the story of a woman who is the victim of a violent act.  In Mayhem: The Three Lives of a Woman, protagonist, Evelyn Kunkel Gant does indeed live three lives. She is daughter, wife, and then, as a victim of sexual assault, a pariah—one who never receives any kind of compassion or vindication—except through the telling of her story.  Elizabeth Harris takes us to the rural Texas of the 1930s—a place immersed in gender and social expectations that bring no sympathy to Evelyn.

Writing can be therapeutic and reading makes us feel less alone--these aren't very original ideas but they bear repeating because they are so true.

Houses have figured prominently in the writing career of Sandra Cisneros. Her first book and breakthrough publication was the 1984 “House on Mango Street.” The coming of age novel put Cisneros on the map of American writers but Cisneros herself was still looking for her place on the map of the world.

Texas Matters: Commentary - Crossing Borders

Jun 12, 2015
Michel Marizco / Fronteras

Border Security was a priority for the 84th Texas Legislative Session. The lawmakers passed a budget that will spend 800 million dollars for mission. It’s not clear how the money will be spent, what results are expected and how the Department of Public Safety will be held accountable but it does fulfil political promises.

And as Commentator Yvette Benavides examines - it seems borders in Texas are not always limited to the Rio Grande.

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

This week on Fronteras:

-- How did measles, once eliminated in the United States, make a comeback?  One congressman is using insensitive language and blaming immigrants for the recent outbreak. But has immigration really caused measles to return?  Fronteras examines that concern and the loaded language that surrounds illegal immigration. 

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