Yvette Benavides | Texas Public Radio

Yvette Benavides

The Texas Historical Commission has recognized musician Lydia Mendoza as a significant contributor to Texas history by awarding her an official Texas History Marker.

Courtesy

Some politicians paint such a dire picture of the Texas/Mexico border it’s natural to wonder where all this is leading.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

The immigration debate has prompted a surge in the use of words we didn’t used to hear quite so much. Words like “caravan” or “asylum.” Words matter. Words are loaded with meaning—associations that could denigrate and fail to communicate.  In her commentary, Texas Public Radio contributor Yvette Benavides gives us a lesson in semantics. Benavides is a professor of English and creative writing at Our Lady of the Lake University.

*****

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

During President Donald Trump’s recent State of the Union Address, he paid special attention to the state of the Southern border.

"As we speak, large, organized caravans are on the march to the United States. We have just heard that Mexican cities, in order to remove the illegal immigrants from their communities, are getting trucks and buses to bring them up to our country in areas where there is little border protection. I have ordered another 3,750 troops to our southern border to prepare for the tremendous onslaught," Trump said. 

Contributed photo

Texas music legend Rita Vidaurri, also known as La Calandria, died Jan. 16. She was 94.

On this episode, we listen to a 2004 interview between TPR contributor Yvette Benavides and Vidaurri, who, at 80, was enjoying a second career on stage.


Commentary: A Toxic 2018

Dec 8, 2018
David Martin Davies

 

The end of the year means a look at the word of the year from a variety of dictionaries. 

The top word, presumably, is a metonym for our collective experience of the year’s events.   

 


State of Texas Department of Health and Human Services

The largest nursing home provider in Texas filed for bankruptcy. Senior Care Centers filed for Chapter 11 protection. The Dallas based company operates about 100 facilities in Texas reported more than $100 million in debt.

The company pledged that patient care will not suffer due to its financial woes.

However, the Texas Health Care Association, an advocacy group for the long-term care industry, said this bankruptcy sends a signal that the industry that many elderly Texans depend on is in serious trouble.

Darko Stojanovic/Pixabay Public Domain

Election Day is Tuesday, and health insurance for those with pre-existing conditions is a major issue. Then, the number of troops sent to the U.S.-Mexico border has now reached World War I levels, and what to make of it (09:45). And finally, contributor Yvette Benavides was at a bus station in San Antonio, where dozens of asylum-seekers from Central America were sent (15:45). 


When Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced his re-election bid, he highlighted many of his accomplishments from his years in office.

What he left out was his indictment on three felony charges. We talk to Texas Observer staff writer Michael Barajas about his case.

Then, a homemade political yard sign caught the attention of Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. So much so, it was seized by police (11:00). And finally, here in Texas, folks opt to observe Indigenous People’s Day rather than Columbus Day (22:52).  


Pages