WWII | Texas Public Radio

WWII

George Wunderlich / AMEDD

Two new exhibits at the U.S. Army Medical Department Museum at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston celebrate the work of medics during World War II.  

University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, https://texashistory.unt.edu; crediting National WASP WWII Museum.

Visitors to the San Antonio International Airport can now pay homage to the women pilots of World War II. A traveling photography exhibit unveiled Tuesday showcases the lives of Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) and their training at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas. 

Eli Reed

Latinos have fought in every U.S. conflict, but an accurate number of how many served is still unknown.

Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez founded the Voces Oral History Project. For the past two decades, Voces has explored the stories of Mexican-Americans who defended the U.S., both overseas and on the home front, filling the gaps in this piece of American history.

Photo by Senior Airman Tristin English / 502nd Air Base Wing Public Affairs

Hundreds gathered for a memorial service to celebrate the life of retired Air Force Lt. Col. Richard “Dick” Cole at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph on Thursday. Cole was the last surviving member of the Doolittle Raiders, a daring group of World War II airmen who bombed Tokyo only months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He passed away in San Antonio on April 9 at age 103.

Photo courtesy of Wayne and Eileen Gotke

A Kerrville man was reunited with a piece of WWII history Friday. His father’s wedding ring, recovered nearly 75 years after it vanished in a German prisoner of war camp, made its way home.


An effort to prevent scurvy in U.S. troops led to the growth of the orange juice industry, popularizing what had been a relatively obscure beverage.