World Music | Texas Public Radio

World Music

Amidst the constant drumbeat of 2019's political talk, of raising walls and shutting out opposition — this year's globalFEST artists and organizers articulated a very clear vision, one that makes room for bracingly new voices. The one-night festival of global music, held each January in Manhattan, featured a remarkable lineup of musicians from around the world, including India, Cuba, Ukraine, Mozambique, and even New York City itself. Now in its sixteenth year, globalFEST was founded in a post-Sept.

Musical Bridges Around The World

Musical Bridges Around the World begins its annual music festival Saturday.

Founder and Musical Director Anya Grokhovski says the festival, in its fifth year, brings performers from all over the world to play in the Alamo City.


You might think traditional West African music and Western classical music would share little common ground. But Ladilikan, the album from Mali's Trio Da Kali and San Francisco's Kronos Quartet is a welcome landmark in the history of unlikely musical collaborations.

Two new albums of Puerto Rican music are giving vintage musical styles new meaning in the present. Singer Ileana Cabra and the leaders of the group Miramar all had careers in cutting edge salsa and pop; on their own, though, they've chosen to update older sounds, especially the melancholy, romantic bolero. Their new albums -- Ileana Cabra's iLevitable and Miramar's Dedication to Sylvia Rexach — are both out now.

As President Obama touched down in Cuba over the weekend, Cuban artists were making waves at the SXSW music festival in Austin.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Eva Salina has Dutch and Jewish roots and hails from a quiet California beach town — but musically, she's traveled a path far afield from her upbringing. The Santa Cruz native says she was headed in quite a different direction when she stumbled into a love for traditional Balkan vocal music.

Most nights, you can walk into a blues club and find a harmonica player blowing their heart out onstage. The wailing, honking sound associated with Western movies and juke joints is what many harp players have emulated for decades. But in the rarefied world of the harmonica, the earth has lately shifted on its axis — primarily because of one man.

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