Wimberley | Texas Public Radio

Wimberley

Eli Cohen|Courtesy of the City of Wimberley

Hill Country residents are worried developers will scar the area’s scenic hill tops, and one town has decided to do something about it. 


From Texas Standard

Wimberley Independent School District in Central Texas is moving forward with the construction of a new environmentally friendly school. The project focuses on the conservation of water.

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor map released Thursday, most of Texas is completely drought-free. That's a stark change from where the state was this time last year, let alone the extreme drought conditions of years past. But even as drought pressure has abated, water remains both a valuable and scarce resource in Texas, making it significant that this Hill Country elementary school is being constructed as the most water-efficient in the state.

Nick Dornak is the director of Watershed Services at Texas State University's Meadows Center. He says the school will be the first “one water” school in the state, incorporating water and wastewater treatment directly into the building.

The Boot Whisperer

Aug 10, 2017

From Texas Standard:

Ulli Johnston says most customers at her store don’t know her name, they just call her the "Boot Whisperer."

At her Wild West Store in Wimberley, Texas, Johnston is known for being able to look at people’s feet and find them the perfect pair of cowboy boots.

Ryan E. Poppe

It’s been a year since Memorial Day weekend flood waters barreled down the Blanco River near Wimberley, sweeping away homes and killing 12 people.

One year later, Wimberley residents are now better prepared for a major flood, but like shell-shocked soldiers, they still struggle with what happened.

Wimberley homeowner Mack Stringfellow will never forget what he heard from his bedroom window, as the fast moving waters pushed aside the concrete and steel beams of the Fisher Store Bridge, sweeping it down stream. 

Wimberley Library

 

The Memorial Day flood in Wimberley was one of the most talked about disasters of 2015, and it remains a day that the community doesn't want to forget.  Members of the Wimberley City Library are putting the finishing touches on a book that is an oral history of those who lived through the flood and remained behind to pick up the pieces. 

YouTube.com

As flooding rains continue to dump on areas of South and Central Texas, many residents that either reported into work or were evacuated in the early morning hours are now wondering how and when they’ll make it home.  

Officials in Wimberley began sending out emergency alerts to evacuate areas of the Blanco River and its attributing creeks this morning.  Louie Bond is editor for Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.  She lives in Wimberley but made the early morning commute to Austin before the flooding began.

Bond said she has neighbors in harm’s way.

Ryan E. Poppe

 Homeowner Bob Flocke lives just outside of Wimberley along the Blanco River.  During the May floods, Flocke decided to stay in his home after Hays County officials urged him and his family to evacuate to higher ground. He says he and his family are lucky to have survived what happened next.

  “The water was not in the house, but it was climbing up the house. It came up fast, it was climbing up and it had not gotten into the front yard yet, which is higher than the back,” Flocke explained.

Ryan E. Poppe

The sound of chainsaws cutting through driftwood or downed trees is commonplace these days along the Blanco River. In May, raging floodwaters lifted homes off their foundations and ripped 50-year old cypress trees out of the ground.  

Linda Moore had about four feet of water in her home and lost nearly lost everything in the flood. “A lot of the trees are down, almost all the trees down by the river are down. My rainwater collection tank floated a little bit. Both my cars were filled with water and totaled,” Moore elaborated.

Courtesy: The Texas Department of Transportation / via Facebook

SAN MARCOS — Recordings of 911 calls reveal frantic requests for help from people staying in homes along the flooded Blanco River in Central Texas, including a woman who said the house she was in was “floating.”

Hays County released the recordings Tuesday to the Austin American-Statesman. The calls came in over Memorial Day weekend, when the area saw heavy rains and massive flooding. Nine bodies have been recovered in Hays County. The victims include Laura McComb, 34, who called to report water was creeping higher and there was no way to escape.

“We are on the Blanco River in Wimberley, and the water is up to the second story into the house,” McComb said. “It’s coming up to the second floor. I mean it’s so high up. And we have no exit out.”

Today, nearly two weeks after the catastrophic Memorial Day floods in Texas, search crews are still combing the banks of the Blanco River looking for three people who remain missing. They've already found eight bodies.

Meanwhile, residents of the tourist and retirement town of Wimberley, Texas, hit hardest by the flood, are cleaning up and struggling to reclaim their lives.

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