Willie Nelson | Texas Public Radio

Willie Nelson

It's been about a year since World Cafe caught up with Willie Nelson, and he's been busy! Willie just released his latest album called Ride Me Back Home, made with his producer-collaborator Buddy Cannon.

Michael O'brien

A giant in the world of Texas arts died on Sunday. Bill Wittliff was a writer and photographer, and his work made Texas famous around the world.  

Hector Saldaña is curator at the Wittliff Collection at Texas State University in San Marcos. He said Wittliff left his mark on several artistic fields, and was perhaps most impactful in screenwriting.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

From Texas Standard:

A handful of musical instruments are so closely associated with certain artists that the instruments themselves are known by their first names.

In 1975, I was living in San Diego and needed a job. The roommate of a friend of mine was a scientist at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. He said a colleague of his was looking to hire a lab technician, so I applied and got the job. The scientist I worked for was some guy from a small town in Texas. His name? Jim Allison.

Review: Willie Nelson, 'Summertime'

Feb 18, 2016

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Love your old uncles while you have them. Mine used to hang around near the drinks table at family gatherings, comparing the weird bumps growing on their ears, sharing jokes they'd learned in the Army, and blowing the kids away with stories culled from decades' worth of interesting exploits. Most have gone to the next beyond by now, but I hold my uncles' devil-may-care spirit close to my heart. People have a lot to learn from those among them who've lived long enough to not worry about any particular outcome.

The first thing you notice when you get on Willie Nelson's tour bus is a pungent aroma. Parked outside a gigantic casino and performance venue in Thackerville, Okla., Nelson offers NPR's David Greene a joint, which Greene declines. Nelson says he understands.

For more conversations with music makers, check out NPR's Music Interviews.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Again thanks for listening. This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

When Willie Nelson was a young hustler selling songs to Patsy Cline's people, he probably never thought he'd become the crowd-anointed sage of country music. But that's what happened as the Redheaded Stranger went gray, turned smoking weed into a brand and a virtue, and produced a discography that added up to its own American Songbook.