West Side | Texas Public Radio

West Side

Edward Benavides

Dance to some Mariachi Christmas music. Get down with some Ranky Tanky rhythms. And then reflect on the season with a classic piece from Handel. This weekend will hum with holiday music, and here are the details. 


Courtesy Sam Kindrick

Spot Barnett, a saxophone player who became a San Antonio musical legend, died last week.


Credit Esperanza Peace and Justice Center

There's a groundbreaking at 10 a.m. Monday to restore an old West Side nightclub which ended up being much more than just a nightclub.


Esperanza Peace & Justice Center

Poor communities that have a rich cultural history often battle developers and city officials who may want to demolish structures to make way for improved public housing, parking lots or apartment buildings.

Sarah Zenaida Gould, co-chair of Latinos in Heritage Conservation, said good intentions aside, it’s not what’s best for the community.


Pixabay CC0 http://bit.ly/2HBrnw3

Development and rapid population growth are putting more vulnerable San Antonio neighborhoods increasingly at risk for gentrification. 

  

Signs around the West Side of San Antonio declare "Mi barrio no se vende" ("My neighborhood isn't for sale") but with rising property taxes and perpetual "buy as is" offers, many houses in near downtown neighborhoods are being sold, remodled and flipped. 

Courtesy of Charlotte Anne Lucas

A mural that gave a West Side eatery some of its flavor is now gone. But a new mural unveiled this week recreates some of that original beauty.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

Brian Kirkpatrick | Texas Public Radio

Community activists, business owners, and residents are speaking up about crime problems in Prospect Hill, a community on the West Side of San Antonio.

Alazán-Apache Courts was the first public housing project in San Antonio. It was built in 1941, after San Antonio priest Carmelo Tranchese lobbied Eleanor Roosevelt to create affordable housing in San Antonio’s impoverished, mostly Mexican-American West Side. 

The Esperanza Peace and Justice Center and the Westside Preservation Alliance have collaborated for the new exhibit “Los Courts.” It highlights the residents and culture that grew out of the projects.  


A new book for young adults reflects on the life of voting rights activist and West Side San Antonio native Willie Velasquez. Author Bárbara Renaud Gonzalez  (0:17) joins us to discuss her new novel. Then, a West Side San Antonio record shop spins the oldies and keeps neighborhood pride alive (15:57).


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