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Water

SAWS

Late last week, Brian Chasnoff at the San Antonio Express-News got his hands on a draft copy of a hotly contested and some might say suppressed city-commissioned report on San Antonio's water security. The study, conducted by Texas A&M University labeled the Vista Ridge pipeline deal, which will cost San Antonio more than $3 billion by the time all is said and done. 

You can read the entire report here.  

The Source: America's Obsession With Lawns

Aug 31, 2015
WikiCommons http://bit.ly/1KA5w4Q

Thanks to Leave It To Beaver and The Brady Bunch, golf courses and baseball fields, green lawns are a keystone of the American cultural psyche. Paul Robbins, director of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, asks how the US fell so deeply in love with green lawns. In his new book, Lawn People, he explores the impact and toll of that interesting relationship. 

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

The new water rate proposed by the San Antonio Water System will go before the San Antonio City Council soon, and there are some who think the rate is fleecing residents. Meredith McGuire from the Sierra Club argues that the rate continues a policy of subsidizing developers and suburban sprawl at the expense of the the common user through fixed, regressive fees, and a rate that rewards commercial and industrial users.

San Antonio Water System

The San Antonio Water System has issued a record number of landscaping coupons to customers wanting to lower yard water usage.

When SAWS first debuted its Watersaver Landscape Coupon program in 2013, there were about 4,000 applicants. Karen Guz, the Director of Conservation at SAWS, says the number “shocked us, honestly. we didn’t think we’d have that high of participation.”

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide.

As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists. This miscalculation — and the subsequent mismanagement of water resources in those states — has created a water crisis that now affects nearly 40 million Americans.

GEAA / http://www.aquiferalliance.net/

LUBBOCK — The torrential storms of last month essentially ended one of Texas’ worst-ever droughts, but much of the excess water has already flowed into the Gulf of Mexico or will evaporate by year’s end.

With a wary eye toward the next prolonged dry-streak that inevitably will come, some think expanding the use of underground aquifers may help slake the thirst of Texas’ rapidly growing population.

Three trillion gallons of water gushed from swollen Texas rivers into the Gulf of Mexico in May, and another 2 trillion gallons will likely evaporate from state reservoirs by year’s end. Combined, the lost water would be enough to serve Texas’ booming population for an entire year.

Does Your Water Bottle Really Need to be 'Smart?'

Jun 12, 2015

From Texas Standard:

Imagine a world where you could count every sip of water you took – and your boss could see it too. That’s the idea behind brothers Jac and Davis Saltzgiver’s new invention, Trago.

“We allow coaches and teams, or even parents, to monitor an entire group of people with multiple bottles, so a coach or trainer could make sure their entire team is well hydrated before a game,” Davis Saltzgiver says.

JJ Harrison / Wikimedia Commons

SAN ANTONIO – Per City ordinance the San Antonio City Manager announces the end to water restrictions effective Wednesday, June 10.

Recent deluges have sent the Edwards Aquifer level skyrocketing. Since the 10-day average of the aquifer is currently well above 660 feet SAWS has advised the City Manager it would be appropriate to end drought restrictions. The City of San Antonio has been in some type of water restrictions since 2011, and has stayed in Stage Two restrictions since 2012.

Flickr user Judy Baxter / cc

After the Texas Supreme Court decided against taking up the case Edwards Aquifer Authority vs. Glenn and JoLynn Bragg, a lower court award of several hundred thousand dollars and a ruling that some argue erodes the power of groundwater districts was cemented. The award now, several years and crop cycles later has not been determined.

California towns have been running out of water for the past 6 months. A plan to ration water in southern California is expected to be voted on next week.

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