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Water

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The legal challenges that come with private property rights and Texas’ growing need for water were the topic of the most recent Texas Water Symposium, held on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin.

Kyle Craig Photography

A full house at the Pearl Stable was on hand to reflect on the legacy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority on the occasion of its 20th anniversary, and look to the future, at the San Antonio Clean Technology Forum’s seventh annual Water Forum and luncheon.

Flickr: Shannon https://flic.kr/p/duo8ut / CC

They may be small, but micro flora and fauna play a significant role in the ecosystem of Texas waterways. At the Texas Water Symposium on Thursday, September 1 in Kerrville, a panel of educators, researchers and ecologists shared their insights on the impact of human development on these small creatures, and explained their role in keeping our rivers and streams healthy.

In the audio, you’ll learn in detail:

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Louisa Jonas / Texas Public Radio

A sewage water recycling center that smells good? One that doesn’t use chemicals? Dos Rios Water Recycling Center is the largest of San Antonio Water System’s recycling centers. The plant treats about 80 million gallons of sewage water a day using biological processes that attract unwanted pests. The solution has involved using nature to control nature.

From Texas Standard:

These days clean water from the tap is often a privilege that is taken for granted. We're accustomed to running to the sink whenever we're thirsty. But as the brown tap water in Flint and Crystal City show, we cannot always trust that clean water will be available.

But water contamination isn't always something that is easy to sniff out because of its color or smell. For some, especially those living in rural agricultural areas, water may have substances that put pregnant women in danger without their knowledge.


Before you take a gulp of water, try to mentally trace where that water that just gushed out of your taps has been: How did it go from that weird-tasting raindrop to the clear, odorless water that is sitting in your glass now?

Safe drinking water is a privilege Americans often take for granted — until a health crisis like the one in Flint, Mich., happens that makes us think about where it comes from and how we get it.

SAWS

The San Antonio Water System could save millions of dollars in financing for one Vista Ridge project that’s on a priority list for funding.  But getting that low interest loan may depend on another Vista Ridge project didn’t make the list. 

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

For more than a decade, 50,000 Texans have been exposed to water contaminated with unsafe levels of arsenic, according to a study by the Environmental Integrity Project and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The EPA lowered the safe level of arsenic to 10 parts per billion in 2006. 

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