Water | Texas Public Radio

Water

Nathan Cone / TPR

This edition of the Texas Water Symposium features lawmakers and analysts looking at current and proposed legislation that will affect water resources and property rights in Texas. Topics addressed include the Kinder Morgan pipeline project, flooding, water well protection, the Texas State Park system, and more.

Recorded March 28, 2019 at the Texas State Capitol building.

Moderator:

Vanessa Puig-Williams, Puig-Williams Law, PLLC

Panelists:

Paul Domenick http://bit.ly/2CwC9C6

Texas received an F when it comes to lead levels in drinking water at schools, according to the Texas Public Interest Research Group and Environment Texas Research and Policy Center. That was the same grade it got in 2017. Texas was among 22 states that received the failing grade.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Jessica Quintanilla, a hydrologist for the Edwards Aquifer Authority, sloshes back onto shore in her black waterproof boots from the middle of this creek just off Scenic Loop Road, south of Grey Forest.

“Next, we have to set up the peristaltic pump,” she said, as she inserts the white, quarter-inch tube she dragged 15 feet back to shore from her water sensor, before flipping on a generator and starting the pump.


Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Across the Hill Country, there’s a proliferation of permit applications to discharge treated wastewater directly into Hill Country creeks and rivers. Population increases are putting pressure on utilities to expand services, and many do not have the technical or financial resources to explore non-discharge options. At this Texas Water Symposium panel held on November 8, 2018 at Schreiner University, panelists discuss the implications of wastewater discharge for creek and river health and for the quality of rural well water, and explore the alternatives for the region.

Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio

Despite the Fourth of July rain, we remain way behind annual rainfall amounts, so the San Antonio Water System continues its crackdown on water wasters. 

From Texas Standard.

The Permian Basin is in another oil boom. Output is reaching record highs and it’s expected to grow even more. But one issue facing the area is water. Water is necessary to sustain life, but natural gas companies need it for fracking operations, as well. Now, the city of Midland will become the second city in the Permian Basin, after Odessa, to make a deal with an energy company to take over some water management.

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

“We are looking at starting the summer months, in the Hill Country, with only five inches of rain,” Katherine Romans, Executive Director of the Hill Country Alliance, explained during the opening of the most recent Texas Water Symposium on Wednesday, May 30. As the Hill Country continues to grow at unprecedented rates, the demands on limited water resources will increasingly outpace the current supply.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Many rural groundwater conservation boards are considering or have already decided to export some of their water to nearby urban centers. Farmers are concerned the state is developing a Robin Hood system for its water needs, one where landowners lose.

 


Eileen Pace / TPR News

U.S. representatives Henry Cuellar, Joaquín Castro, and Lloyd Doggett Thursday secured an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act which would improve the wastewater infrastructure for Joint Base San Antonio and surrounding areas.

The Water Rescue Foundation

The Federal Emergency Management Agency spent $361 million on bottled water in Puerto Rico by the end of January, after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island in September.


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