Voting | Texas Public Radio

Voting

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The names of 95,000 registered voters were flagged Friday by the Texas secretary of state's office for what it said were possible issues of valid citizenship, prompting pushback and even litigation from civil rights groups. A few days later, the state office quietly called counties to let them know many of those voters names actually should not have made the list.


Ryan Poppe

Updated 12 p.m.

After Texas state officials announced it was flagging tens of thousands of registered voters for citizenship checks, two civil rights groups have filed a lawsuit, citing voter intimidation.

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Michael Stravato / For The Texas Tribune

The Texas secretary of state's office announced Friday it would send local election officials a list of 95,000 registered voters who the state says counties should consider checking to see whether they are U.S. citizens and, therefore, legally eligible to vote.

Photo courtesy of Gina Ortiz Jones' campaign

Democrat Gina Ortiz Jones conceded Monday to her Republican opponent Will Hurd in the race for the 23rd Congressional District of Texas, which stretches from San Antonio to El Paso.

JustGrimes/Flickr

This Election Day, what rights do you currently have as a voter in the U.S. and in Texas? With early voter turnout surpassing that of previous midterms, citizens have much to consider when heading to the polls. On "The Source," we'll hear from the Texas Civil Rights Project, the Brennan Center for Justice and St. Mary's University professor emeritus Henry Flores.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Updated 6:06 p.m.

The deadline to register to vote in Texas has arrived. Tuesday is the final day to submit registrations or have them postmarked. The Bexar County Elections Office has taken on additional staff to handle the influx of applications.

NAACP President Derrick Johnson speaks at an opening session of the civil right organization's annual convention in San Antonio July 16, 2018.
Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Thousands of people from across the country are in downtown San Antonio this week for the annual convention of the NAACP.

The 109th gathering of the civil rights organization is focused on voting and civic engagement, with a theme of “Defeat Hate. Vote."

From Texas Standard.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5 to 4 on Monday that it was OK for Ohio to remove people from voter registration rolls if those voters skip a few elections and then fail to respond to a notice from election officials. Ohio claimed this was necessary for the proper upkeep of voter registration lists and to prevent voter fraud.

Republicans have been pushing for such restrictions without much actual evidence of fraud, while Democrats have often seen such moves as attempts to suppress voting. What does the ruling mean for Texas?

Ryan Poppe

Candidates running in Texas’ primary election are attending rallies and making last minute appearances at various events — anything and everything within their power to get out the vote before Tuesday’s election.  

 

 


David Martin Davies / TPR News

Texas Democrats continue to outpace Republicans in the number of early votes cast ahead of the March primary. In some sections of the state, thousands more voters cast a ballot in the Democratic primary during the early voting period.


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