Voting Rights | Texas Public Radio

Voting Rights

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Latinos will make up the largest minority voting group in 2020. What can the history and rise of the Latino vote tell us about the changing U.S. political landscape?

  

Flickr/Keith Ivey

When Texans head to the polls on Super Tuesday in 2020, the act of voting could be very different. Texas lawmakers are looking at bills to cut property taxes and boost school spending, and they're also looking at ways to secure elections in the state, particularly with Senate Bill 9. 


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Texas lawmakers are working on an omnibus elections bill that could crack down on cases of election fraud. Supporters say the proposed legislation will curb illegal voting while others worry that if passed, the new rules could result in voter intimidation and suppression.


Updated at 1:41 p.m.

Willie Velasquez grew up on San Antonio’s West Side, and learned early on that by empowering his fellow Latinos, they could bring change to their own neighborhoods.

In 1974, Velasquez founded the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and organized 1,000 voter drives across the Southwest. His efforts also more than doubled the number of Latino elected officials, from 1,500 in 1974 to 3,300 in 1988.

A new book for young adults reflects on the life of voting rights activist and West Side San Antonio native Willie Velasquez. Author Bárbara Renaud Gonzalez  (0:17) joins us to discuss her new novel. Then, a West Side San Antonio record shop spins the oldies and keeps neighborhood pride alive (15:57).


How Election Day Chaos Hurts Texas Voters 

Long wait times, confusion about voter ID and questions about voter registration – these are just three of the barriers that potential voters ran into during the last November General Election.

That’s according to a new report from the Texas Civil Rights Project, a voting right advocacy group.