virus | Texas Public Radio

virus

Two men look on at protestors in San Antonio on May 30.
Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

In times of civil unrest or social upheaval, protests seek to raise awareness for a message or cause in solidarity with others. Crowds of people seeking to alter the status quo march in close proximity, often chanting, shouting and singing -- none of which are conducive to mitigating the spread of COVID-19.


Shelter-in-place orders and distancing guidelines have kept COVID-19 case numbers at a manageable level so far, but the threat of community transmission is still very real.


Scientists spend a lot of time studying how the coronavirus and other emerging diseases end up in human populations. 

About three-quarters of new diseases are zoonotic, which means they are transmitted by animals. 

From Texas Standard:

 

A couple of months ago, 30 dead rabbits were found near Fort Bliss.

 

That's when Ken Waldrup, who works for the Texas Department of State Health Services, as a regional zoonosis control veterinarian in El Paso, where Fort Bliss is located, got a call.

COVID-19 poses a more serious risk to people with underlying health conditions and chronic illnesses, including both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In Bexar County, the coronavirus pandemic is now layered on top of an existing disparity-and-diabetes crisis.


At least 554 coronavirus cases and 20 deaths had been confirmed in San Antonio as of Wednesday evening. 


As the coronavirus pandemic continues to upend daily life, news coverage is fast-paced and ever-changing. There isn't always enough time to address all listener concerns on air on "The Source," so we're teaming up with experts to get your questions answered.

The U.S. health care system could become overwhelmed by the influx of people infected with the coronavirus and its disease COVID-19 as soon as April 15, even with strong social distancing rules and other protective measures in place. 


Families are scrambling to find child care amid the coronavirus outbreak, and the lack of viable options is hitting low-income Texans and essential workers hardest. 


As local and state government work to curb the proliferation of COVID-19, people across the U.S. are being told to adhere to temporary shelter-in-place and self-isolation orders, social distancing rules and in extreme cases, mandatory quarantine.


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