veterans' benefits | Texas Public Radio

veterans' benefits

This month’s mass shooting at a Texas church has raised questions of whether the military does enough to help former service members with bad conduct discharges. They're not eligible for veterans' mental health care.  

Carson Frame / TPR News

At a Veterans Summit at San Antonio College on Saturday, Congressman Lloyd Doggett fielded questions about staffing problems, long wait times, and claims backlogs at the Veterans Administration.

Flickr / Shehan Peruma

The Veterans Administration is trying to streamline its disability claims process by involving outside organizations. 

On September 8th, the VA unveiled its Decision Ready Claims program, which promises a decision for upgrading disability compensation within 30 days of filing. That reduced wait time could be a plus for many vets. 

From Texas Standard:

Every year thousands of veterans benefit from the so-called post-9/11 GI bill, which pays for tuition to help vets afford college.

The original GI bill was credited with lifting many families into the middle class after World War II. Texas has a similar version of the bill, called the Hazlewood Act and the Texas Comptroller – Glenn Hegar, the man with the state's check book – says the act is too pricey.

The act goes back to 1943 and Hegar says three factors have contributed to the rise in expenses in providing this service to Texans.

 


Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

"If I'm in the wrong, I'll admit it. But I'm not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA," he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

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