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vaccines

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The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued new guidelines for vaccinating kids against the flu.


A hospital in Texas has cut ties with a nurse who apparently posted about a young patient with the measles in a Facebook group dedicated to "anti-vaxxers," people who reject the scientific evidence of the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

Screenshots show a self-identified nurse saying the sick child's symptoms helped her understand why people vaccinate their children, but that "I'll continue along my little non-vax journey with no regrets."

Staff Sgt. Benjamin W. Stratton/U.S. Air Force

The percentage of students claiming non-medical vaccine exemptions in Bexar County grew from 0.32 percent in 2011 to 0.8 percent for the 2017-2018 school year. 


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A San Antonio researcher has gotten a nearly $2 million grant to come up with a vaccine against the fungus that causes valley fever.


Flickr user Thompson Rivers University / cc

The majority of Texans agree that parents should be required to vaccinate their children, but an annual poll conducted by The Texas Lyceum found that a “consequential minority” of Texans don't.


Each year, about 31,000 men and women in the U.S. are diagnosed with a cancer caused by an infection from the human papillomavirus, or HPV. It's the most common sexually transmitted virus and infection in the U.S.

In women, HPV infection can lead to cervical cancer, which leads to about 4,000 deaths per year. In men, it can cause penile cancer. HPV also causes some cases of oral cancer, cancer of the anus and genital warts.

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A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Metro Health

Metro Health is offering free vaccines this summer to 11 and 12-year-olds participating in the Parks and Recreation Summer Youth Program.  

Science tells us vaccines are one of the greatest inventions of the last 150 years. They've all but eradicated deadly diseases like smallpox, polio, and measles from most of the world.

Vaccines are a treatment designed to arm a person against those viruses and other diseases by providing immunity. They work by exposing you to a weakened version of a pathogen, like a flu virus. Your body's immune system then learns the pathogen's characteristics and develops the necessary antibodies to resist the pathogen if later exposed to it.

In the past few months, there have been several outbreak of mumps in Texas — a handful of cases linked to a Halloween party in Dallas, other cases to a cheerleading contest in Arlington.

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