UT Health SA | Texas Public Radio

UT Health SA

Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

In November, a scientist in China claimed he used a tool on the DNA of embryos to design twin girls who were born immune to HIV. That tool left many wondering: How does it alter human genes? Is it OK to alter human genes? Several San Antonio researchers share their thoughts.


Recovery Concepts http://bit.ly/2RNusAB

A small first-in-human trial of a medicine that is a potential game changer in the treatment of age-related diseases like Alzheimer's has shown promise in San Antonio.

 


Will Sansom / UT Health San Antonio

Updated Dec. 12

 

Advocates for detained migrants in Texas met San Antonio medical students to discuss forming future partnerships that could help improve the health and well-being of people hoping to immigrate to the U.S.


Alberto Ruggieri / Getty Images

A San Antonio researcher seeks new treatments for schizophrenia while a San Antonio man strives to live a life of purpose with the disease.


Fabrice Florin / WikiCommons| http://bit.ly/2uwI0ma

UT Health San Antonio surgeon Donald Jenkins supports gun rights. The San Antonio surgeon is among the gun-owning doctors who has signed on to a new set of gun-safety recommendations.


Will Sansom / UT Health San Antonio

San Antonio researchers have found a critical period of time during which some mobility might be restored to patients with multiple sclerosis. This discovery has doctors stressing the importance of early diagnosis for those with MS.


From Texas Standard.

One of the burdens of a serious health condition, like cancer or a chronic immune disease, is the heavy medication necessary for treatment. The cost of one day’s medicine can be surprisingly expensive, and that doesn’t take into account the physical toll and side effects that the drugs can have on one’s body.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

University of Texas Health San Antonio is changing the name of its cancer center after the Mays Family Foundation committed to a multi-million dollar donation. The foundation has provided a total of $30 million over the last three years.


Carson Frame / TPR News

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has a reputation for being difficult to treat, especially in active duty military and veteran populations. That may soon change,  according to research findings shared Wednesday at the 2017 San Antonio Combat PTSD Conference.

New research suggests that Latino children are more likely to suffer from depression and other mental health illnesses, but only 8 percent of Latinos say their child has received mental health services.

Latino youth are depressed at a higher rate than any minority besides Native Americans, according to the Salud America! network at UT Health San Antonio.

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