U.S. Customs and Border Patrol | Texas Public Radio

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

Sara Melendez (left) is a public affairs officer with U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Rafael Garza is a special operations supervisor with the Border Patrol Sector in Laredo.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

The COVID-19 pandemic hasn’t stopped some people, including those seeking asylum, from crossing into the U.S. at its southern border.


From Texas Standard:

Law enforcement officers have been out in force at nationwide protests denouncing police brutality against black Americans. At some events, law enforcement included local officers, National Guard troops and, in some cases, Border Patrol officers. In Minneapolis, where the police killing of George Floyd ignited the recent wave of protests, U.S. Customs and Border Protection even flew drones to monitor the protests.

There's no dispute on whether Jesus Mesa Jr. killed 15-year-old Sergio Adrián Hernández Güereca.

He did. And there's a video of it.

In 2010 Mesa, an on-duty U.S. Border Patrol agent who was at the border in El Paso, Texas, shot Hernández at least twice — once in the face. At the time, the boy, a Mexican national, was on the southern side of the border in Ciudad Juarez.

A sick 18-month-old girl (center) was sent to Guatemala along with her mom and sister after being denied asylum into the U.S.
Provided

A Honduran mother and her two young daughters reached the Texas-Mexico border in December — and just this week — were deported to Guatemala.

Federal agents were patrolling the Rio Grande in an airboat between Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, in September 2012. They say a group of men in a park on the Mexican side of the river began throwing rocks at them.

"I just remember the boat. They started to shoot and they hit him in the heart, and he fell to the ground," says Priscila Arévalo, the daughter of one of the Mexican men. "We ran away. When we came back, my papa he was already dead."

Scott Nicol / Sierra Club Borderlands Team

Last week the Trump administration issued a strict new policy that requires migrants to first apply for asylum in a country they passed through en route to the United States, before applying for asylum in the U.S. The rule already faces legal challenges.

  

Kino Lorber

In the 1970s, Mexico made a bet with itself that didn’t pay off. Borrowing heavily against future oil revenues, the country’s economy tanked when the price of oil dropped. As a result, the 1970s and early 1980s might be considered the beginning of the boom in illegal immigration to the United States, as workers looked for a better life north of the Rio Grande.

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For people familiar with the lonesome highways of far West Texas and New Mexico, it's an unusual sight: The ubiquitous Border Patrol checkpoints are all closed. Last month, Homeland Security shifted the checkpoint agents to the border to help process the crush of migrant asylum-seekers.

Otero County, N.M., is so alarmed by the possibility of illegal narcotics flowing north unchecked that it has declared a local state of emergency.

A History Of The Border Patrol

Apr 4, 2019

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