Transportation | Texas Public Radio

Transportation

From Texas Standard:

Here's the situation: you're driving down the freeway and miss your exit. But no need to stress – just take the next exit and pull a U-ie at the light. If you're lucky, that intersection will include a "Texas turnaround," making what you've done perfectly legal. But in other states, this traffic device is unknown.

From Texas Standard:

In an attempt to manage the growing congestion on Texas highways, and corresponding rates of frustration for drivers, the Texas Department of Transportation, or TxDOT, has been implementing what could be called  a market-driven approach to driving. Rather than spend more state dollars on highway-building, Texas has turned to the private sector, which has built toll roads where the cost to drivers fluctuates with traffic demand.

Sometimes, people are the worst. If you want proof of that, sit in traffic.

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) / http://bit.ly/2vzmlZy

Navigating public transportation, arranging for a ride service, or sometimes just getting down the sidewalk are daily situations that can be problematic for people with disabilities.

From Texas Standard.

With more options for transportation, could it be time to ditch the personal car completely?

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin have created a new tool to help people make that call. It’s called Ride or Drive, and it calculates the cost of car ownership versus relying on transportation networking companies like your Lyfts and Ubers.

Dr. Todd Davidson, a research associate at the University of Texas at Austin’s Energy Institute and the co-creator of the Ride or Drive web tool, says they built the online calculator so people could evaluate their own personal situations.

From Texas Standard:

A plan for a high-speed rail line that would allow Texans to travel from Houston to Dallas in a quick 90 minutes is moving forward, but not without a lot of setbacks and continued opposition from some communities along the proposed route. Topics of concern include the possibility that train tracks will bisect private property, the high cost of building the bullet train and its financing.

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) / http://bit.ly/2vzmlZy

An estimated 14 percent of the San Antonio population lives with a disability, according to census data from 2011-2015

From Texas Standard:

In the Alamo City, the mayor's race ended in an upset, as an incumbent running for re-election was defeated for the first time in two decades. The margin was 55-45 percent, and Ivy Taylor, the city's first female, African-American mayor is out, defeated by City Councilmember Ron Nirenberg.

flickr.com

When the Lone Star Rail project fell apart last year, communities along I-35 were left looking for a new plan that would reduce travel time between San Antonio and Austin.  Now, they think they’ve found one. 

MIGUEL GUTIERREZ JR. / KUT News

San Antonio's population is growing by leaps and bounds, but is the transportation system keeping up?

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