Transportation | Texas Public Radio

Transportation

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) / http://bit.ly/2vzmlZy

Navigating public transportation, arranging for a ride service, or sometimes just getting down the sidewalk are daily situations that can be problematic for people with disabilities.

From Texas Standard.

With more options for transportation, could it be time to ditch the personal car completely?

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin have created a new tool to help people make that call. It’s called Ride or Drive, and it calculates the cost of car ownership versus relying on transportation networking companies like your Lyfts and Ubers.

Dr. Todd Davidson, a research associate at the University of Texas at Austin’s Energy Institute and the co-creator of the Ride or Drive web tool, says they built the online calculator so people could evaluate their own personal situations.

From Texas Standard:

A plan for a high-speed rail line that would allow Texans to travel from Houston to Dallas in a quick 90 minutes is moving forward, but not without a lot of setbacks and continued opposition from some communities along the proposed route. Topics of concern include the possibility that train tracks will bisect private property, the high cost of building the bullet train and its financing.

Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0) / http://bit.ly/2vzmlZy

An estimated 14 percent of the San Antonio population lives with a disability, according to census data from 2011-2015

From Texas Standard:

In the Alamo City, the mayor's race ended in an upset, as an incumbent running for re-election was defeated for the first time in two decades. The margin was 55-45 percent, and Ivy Taylor, the city's first female, African-American mayor is out, defeated by City Councilmember Ron Nirenberg.

flickr.com

When the Lone Star Rail project fell apart last year, communities along I-35 were left looking for a new plan that would reduce travel time between San Antonio and Austin.  Now, they think they’ve found one. 

MIGUEL GUTIERREZ JR. / KUT News

San Antonio's population is growing by leaps and bounds, but is the transportation system keeping up?

Shelley Kofler / Texas Public Radio

As San Antonio prepares to add more than 1.6 million new residents it holds the distinction of being the largest city in the country without a rail system to move them. 

This week Texas Public Radio’s Growing Pains Project is looking at options in a series of stories we’re calling, “Stuck Behind the Wheel.”

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Here are a few facts guaranteed to get your attention:  

The San Antonio area adds 146 new residents every day, and they’re bringing their cars.

A 50 minute drive today is expected to take 91 minutes in 2040.  

By then, 39 percent of our roadways will be severely congested all day long.

This week Texas Public Radio’s “Growing Pains” project takes a look at options for getting ahead of the traffic jam,  with a series of reports, “Stuck Behind The Wheel.” We start by looking at how San Antonio’s primary form of mass transit could be part of the solution. 

When the Texas Highway Department was established in Texas in 1917 there were only about 200-thousand cars in Texas.

And those drivers only had fewer than a thousand miles of paved roads in the entire state.

Today the Texas Department of Transportation, TxDot, is responsible for more than 80,000 miles of state paved roads that accommodate more than 25 million vehicles.

Pages