Title 42 | Texas Public Radio

Title 42

A Honduran mother holds her newborn daughter in their apartment. She delivered her baby in a local hospital in the Rio Grande Valley, but she and her daughter were expelled to Mexico, along with the rest of her family.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

A small apartment on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande is not where a 23-year-old Honduran mother thought she’d end up after fleeing her home country.


Sara Melendez (left) is a public affairs officer with U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Rafael Garza is a special operations supervisor with the Border Patrol Sector in Laredo.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

The COVID-19 pandemic hasn’t stopped some people, including those seeking asylum, from crossing into the U.S. at its southern border.


Paul Ratje for KERA News

A public health order issued in late-March by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention barred unauthorized migrants from entering the U.S. The order cited concerns over the “introduction” of an infectious disease to the country, which in this case, is COVID-19. What was an initial effort to contain the spread of the pandemic has since thrown the U.S. asylum process into disarray.

Three reporters — from the Rio Grande Valley, El Paso and Mexico City — took a deep dive on how this CDC order affects the lives of asylum-seeking migrants by examining how it’s being implemented along the Texas-Mexico border.