Think Science | Texas Public Radio

Think Science

TPR

For a quarter of a century, humans have been interacting online through the World Wide Web, and along with the easy access to information have been sea changes in the way we do business, converse, and even fall in love. What influence has the Internet had on the way our minds work? Have we become a nation of “skimmers” that can no longer find time to read a novel? What about the addictive nature of social media, gaming, gambling or even online pornography? How has the Internet changed us?

Cyle Perez / TPR

Those nacho-flavored chips you're eating? They probably taste that way because of micro-flavor particles covering the surface. Engines that burn cleaner fuel? Thank nanotechnology. Sports equipment that lasts longer, flies faster... lighter weight material for aerospace and engineering, even biological machines within the human body... Even a decade ago there were over 800 publicly available products that could be classified as using nanotechnology, which is defined as science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers.

 

Think Science: Bees

Aug 20, 2018
wikicommons

Many people have some understanding of why bees (and other pollinators) are important. So at our last Think Science event on August 17, we opened by asking, “Do you like to eat?” This leds to a discussion of the importance of bees in pollination and our food supply, why bees are in trouble, and what we as consumers can do to ensure the health of both the insect population, as well as humans.

Think Science: Medical Marijuana

May 18, 2018

As the opioid crisis worsens, more Americans are looking toward alternative sources of pain relief, one of which is marijuana. Cannabis has been reported to alleviate pain and anxiety, and may benefit glaucoma and epilepsy patients.

At this Think Science event, TPR reporter Ryan Poppe moderates a discussion on medical marijuana, with special emphasis on CBD oil and other non-psychoactive properties of cannabis that may benefit patients. 

Guests:

Think Science: Weather

Feb 17, 2018
Edward Aspera Jr. / U.S. Air Force

There’s a saying in Texas that goes, “if you don’t like the weather in Texas, wait five minutes.” Despite San Antonio’s reputation for long hot summers, there is an abundance of interesting weather in the Lone Star State, everything from ice storms to hurricanes and even the occasional snowfall. At this Think Science event, recorded February 16, 2018, you’ll hear from two experts in the field about our unique weather patterns, how predictions are made, and what climate change will mean for South Texas over the next 20 years.

Panelists:

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