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Portraits From The Mexico Border: Lives In Limbo As Migrants Try To Escape Gangs, Poverty

Mar 19, 2019

Migrants at the southern border used to be mostly single men from Mexico. Twenty years later, the makeup of that population has changed dramatically.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, an estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer's.

This number includes an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older and approximately 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have early-onset Alzheimer's. One in 10 people age 65 and older has Alzheimer's dementia.

As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the number of new and existing cases of Alzheimer’s.

From Texas Standard:

Though some parts of Texas hit their coldest temperatures of the season this week, overall, this winter has been fairly mild south of Oklahoma -- and wet. That's led to a pretty productive wildflower season. Folks in the Big Bend area say they've seen the largest bluebonnet bloom in decades. And many parts of the state are seeing that bloom slightly early.

University of Texas Press

The Texas Legislature established the Waco State Home as the State Home for Dependent and Neglected Children in 1919. It closed in 1979. Anglo children adjudged by district courts to be neglected were declared wards of the state of Texas, and they were admitted to the home for care, education and training.

For many years, what happened inside the walls of the Waco State Home was only whispered about. Frequently, there was harsh treatment of the children — brutal beatings and sexual abuse.

Valeria Luiselli’s 2017 book “Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions”  is an accounting of the author’s time working as an immigration courtroom interpreter in New York City.  Like many of us, she was preoccupied with the border surge that occurred in 2014 and perplexed at the plight of the unaccompanied children, some 80,000, who made the perilous journey from the violence and despair of their home countries in Central America.  

Rob Crow / Contributed photo

On Tuesday, Feb. 19, two hundred survivors of violent crimes from across Texas will come together on the steps of the Texas State Capitol.

From Texas Standard:

A year ago Thursday, a shooter killed 17 students and staff members at a high school in Parkland, Fla. Three months later, it happened again: A gunman killed eight students and two teachers at Santa Fe High School, south of Houston.

In Texas, there's been skepticism over the years about the intentions of those who call for gun control. But one year after Parkland, and almost nine months after Santa Fe, there are small signs of a shift.

Directories of therapists of color are becoming increasingly popular, like Therapy for Black Girls and the National Queer & Trans Therapists of Color Network. This trend seems to signal a growing openness toward mental health care among minority communities. Still, Dallas counselors say the work isn't finished.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton assured lawmakers on Friday that his office hadn’t launched criminal investigations into nearly 100,000 voters flagged by the secretary of state’s office for citizenship review.

The immigration debate has prompted a surge in the use of words we didn’t used to hear quite so much. Words like “caravan” or “asylum.” Words matter. Words are loaded with meaning—associations that could denigrate and fail to communicate.  In her commentary, Texas Public Radio contributor Yvette Benavides gives us a lesson in semantics. Benavides is a professor of English and creative writing at Our Lady of the Lake University.

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