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Texas Tech

From Texas Standard:

There’s no shortage of worthy choices if you’re debating the best college football, basketball or volleyball team. But when it comes to supremacy in the meat locker, there is only one school you can call the very best: Texas Tech. Over the weekend, the Texas Tech meat judging team claimed their 14th national championship – a record that’s unmatched in the world of amateur meat evaluation.

Texas Tech University's medical school has agreed to end its consideration of race in selecting candidates for admission, an outcome actively sought by the Trump administration.

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center submitted to pressure from the Education Department's Office on Civil Rights, which had conducted a 14-year probe into the use of affirmative action in admission policies at the medical school. The agreement is the first reached by the administration and a school to stop using race as an admissions factor.

From Texas Standard:

In Lubbock, Texas Tech is in a tizzy over what's being called regentgate. The story centers on Robert Duncan, a career public servant who tendered his resignation as chancellor of the Texas Tech University System last week. But the story goes that he effectively got pushed out because of plans for a veterinary school and pressure from very high places. 

LUBBOCK — Police are investigating who spray-painted the words “No Muslims” on a large reproduction of the school seal outside the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center.

KCBD-TV reports the graffiti was likely spray-painted late Wednesday or early Thursday. Crews were cleaning the sign Thursday morning. Texas Tech police told the television station they were investigating. The center called the graffiti “harmful and offensive.

Texas Scientists Find Antibiotic Resistance Blowing in Wind

Mar 30, 2015
Eva Hershaw / The Texas Tribune

COTTON CENTER — After years spent studying the dust that blows across the southern Great Plains, Phil Smith no longer looks at the dark haboobs that routinely rise over Lubbock without a healthy dose of apprehension. 

In a study slated for publication next month, he and Texas Tech University colleague Greg Mayer may have made their biggest discovery yet: DNA from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in cattle feedlots is airborne.   

For years, scientists have known that humans can contract antibiotic-resistant bacteria by consuming contaminated meat or water. The findings by Smith and Mayer indicate that humans could also be exposed to so-called “super bugs” or “super bacteria” traveling through the air.