Texas Matters | Texas Public Radio

Texas Matters

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Last year when Julián Castro declared that he was running for president, few were surprised. But it was clear with the crowded field of candidates it would be an uphill battle for the former San Antonio mayor and secretary of Housing and Urban Development to win the nomination. But sometimes campaigns catch the zeitgeist.


Max Parrott

Raymondville, Texas, is sometimes known by another name: Prisonville USA.  


Nov. 28, 2018 Huntsville
Jack Morgan | Texas Public Radio

Rodney Reed is scheduled to be executed on Wednesday, Nov. 20. This Texas death row case is attracting a lot of attention from celebrities and lawmakers from both parties. They are calling for a halt to the execution to test DNA and other evidence that could possibly exonerate Reed. 


David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Texas Matters first hit the airwaves on Texas Public Radio on Sept. 1, 2000. And each week since Yvette Benavides (my creative partner and wife) and I have produced stories, interviews and commentaries for public radio listeners across Texas.


State of Texas District Viewer

Last August at a posh Austin hotel conference room the American Legislative Exchange Council held its annual meeting, and one of the topics tackled was called “How to Survive Redistricting.”

Discussed were the finer points in the redrawing of district lines. That outcome will impact every American after the 2021 redistricting showdown.

It’s likely that somewhere Democrats are holding similar sessions; and if they are not, then they are guilty of political malpractice.

How did the family name of a founding father of Texas become synonymous with an independent-minded person?

Find out on this episode of "Texas Matters."


Contributed Photo

Julissa Arce graduated at the top of her high school class in San Antonio and went on to succeed in college, before becoming a star of Wall Street. Arce was vice president for Goldman Sachs by the time she was 27 years old — all this while also being an undocumented immigrant living in fear of being deported. She spoke to Texas Public Radio contributor Yvette Benavides.


Contributed photo

Will an ambitious $12 billion project called the Texas Spine protect the Gulf Coast from future hurricane storm surges and who will pay for it? We'll hear from Len Waterworth, a retired coloniel in the Army Corp of Engineers, and Brandt Mannchen, with the Sierra Club.  Then, Texas turtle meat is now off the menu in Asia now that the shell-shocked reptile is protected (17:41). And can Bitcoin make it rain money again in Rockdale? (22:41).


On this episode of "Texas Matters":

  • A re-examination of a 1985 murder raises questions about the use of blood spatter evidence and how murder convictions are minted in Texas. 
  • An effort to build the country's largest wind farm might be in jeopardy but is wind energy the answer?
  • Some believe U.S. politicians have failed to address the threat of global warming and sea level rise. But one expert believes both sides are closer than you might think.
  • So what exaclty is a pickle? That's what is being argued in a Texas court. 


Carlos Sanchez / WikiCommons | http://bit.ly/2uiE8pK

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