Texas Legislature | Texas Public Radio

Texas Legislature

This post was updated on Monday, June 29, at 6:05 p.m. 

Dennis Bonnen, a conservative Republican and Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives, is urging “so-called patriots” to wear facial coverings to prevent transmission of the highly contagious novel coronavirus and its disease COVID-19.


Dominic Anthony Walsh / Texas Public Radio

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak in Texas, healthcare workers have expressed concerns about the availability of personal protective equipment (PPE). Local governments have scrambled to put together contact tracing teams. Five years ago, one state senator tried to plan for a situation like the pandemic happening now.


Marjorie Kamys Cotera | The Texas Tribune

During a June conversation at the Texas Capitol, Republican House Speaker Dennis Bonnen urged hardline conservative activist Michael Quinn Sullivan to target members of their own party in the 2020 primaries and suggested he could get Sullivan’s group media access to the House floor, according to a secret recording of the conversation released Tuesday.

Pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2khy139

Lawmakers get to redraw state and federal legislative district boundaries after every 10-year census count. A Texas redistricting committee is holding field hearings across the state ahead of 2021 mapmaking, including in San Antonio on Thursday.


Pragyan Bezbaruah from Pexels CC0: http://bit.ly/2K46pKc

Monday at 12:30 p.m. on "The Source" – An $11.6 billion plan to reform school finance in Texas unanimously passed through both the Texas House and Senate and is on Gov. Abbott's desk for final approval. 

House Bill 3, or the Texas Plan for Transformational School Finance Reform, includes $6.5 billion to improve public education and pay teachers, plus $5.1 billion to lower school district taxes. 

Ryan E. Poppe

The next Texas legislative session begins in January, and lawmakers began filing their legislation Monday.


Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

State lawmakers are studying how housing instability, homelessness and mental illness are interconnected and what changes might reduce the state’s overall homeless population.


Ryan Poppe / 2018

For some Texans, there’s big money in deer. Breeding and raising whitetail deer, running deer hunts on ranches, it’s all part of a multibillion-dollar industry. But since 2015, deer breeders and the state have been locked in an old-fashioned standoff.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has restricted the movement of this deer population in an effort to contain chronic wasting disease. Meanwhile, the Texas deer industry says this hurts its livelihood, and it plans to push lawmakers to make changes during the 2019 legislative session.

 


Ryan Poppe

Lawmakers at the state Capitol are trying to determine what measures they might take during the upcoming legislative session to provide Texas teachers with better financial incentives to remain in their current district.

 


The Cannabis Training University / CC

Ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, Texans will be seeing — and hearing — a lot of  campaign ads. But, on top of the typical election year barrage of political commercials, some rural Texans will also be seeing a very different kind of ad.

 

 

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